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C Programming Code Examples

C > Beginners Lab Assignments Code Examples

A Calculator in C Using Graphics & Mouse Operations

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/* A Calculator in C Using Graphics & Mouse Operations */ #include"graphics.h" #include"dos.h" #include"stdio.h" #include"math.h" union REGS i,o; char *text[]={ "7","8","9","*", "4","5","6","/", "1","2","3","+", "0","00",".","-", "M","M+","M-","+/-", "MR","MC","x^2","sr", "OFF","AC","CE","="}; int k=0,pass,op,prop,newnum=1,bt,memo=1,d=0,sq; long double num=0,accum,m; void normalbutton(int ,int ,int ,int,char**); void main() { int gd=DETECT,gm,x1,x2,y1,y2,i,j,maxx,maxy,x,y,button; char *text1[]={""","T","o"," ","K","n","o","w"," ","a","b","o", "u","t"," ","m","e"," ","l","o","g","o","n"," ",":"}; char *text2[]={"w","w","w",".","g","e","o","c","i","t","i","e","s", ".","c","o","m","/","t","a","l","k","d","e","e","p", "e","s","h"}; initgraph(&gd,&gm,""); if(initmouse()==0) { closegraph(); restorecrtmode(); printf(" Mouse driver not loded"); exit(1); } showmouseptr(); // x=y=50; movemouseptr(&x,&y); setbkcolor(11); setcolor(1); rectangle(198,140,417,163); rectangle(199,141,418,164); rectangle(197,139,416,162); rectangle(185,130,430,450); rectangle(184,129,431,451); rectangle(182,127,433,454); rectangle(181,126,434,453); //setfillstyle(SOLID_FILL,3); //bar(200,142,415,161); outtextxy(200,50,"A Calculator in C"); outtextxy(200,100,"Press OFF button to exit...."); y1=140; y2=160; for(j=0;j<7;j++) { x1=200; x2=235; y1+=40; y2+=40; for(i=0;i<4;i++) { normalbutton(x1,x2,y1,y2,text); x1+=60; x2+=60; } } while(1) { getmousepos(&button,&x,&y); y1=140; y2=160; /* if( (x>400&&x<450) && (y>400&&y<420) ) { if((button & 1)==1) { sound(500); delay(5); exit(); } } */ for(j=0;j<7;j++) { x1=200; x2=235; y1+=40; y2+=40; for(i=0;i<4;i++) { if((x<x2&&x>x1)&&(y<y2&&y>y1)) { if((button & 1)==1) { gotoxy(28,10); // printf("%d",ch=*text[j*4+i]); // printf("char is %c",ch); bt=j*4+i; // printf("char is %d",j*4+i); setcolor(11); outtextxy(x1+12,y1+7,text[j*4+i]); if(num>pow(10.0,18)) exit(); sound(500);delay(10);nosound(); delay(250); sound(400);delay(10); nosound(); switch (bt) { case 8 : addnum(1); break; case 9 : addnum(2); break; case 10 : addnum(3); break; case 4 : addnum(4); break; case 5 : addnum(5); break; case 6 : addnum(6); break; case 0 : addnum(7); break; case 1 : addnum(8); break; case 2 : addnum(9); break; case 12 : addnum(0); break; case 11 : // plus operation(1); break; case 15 : // minus operation(2); break; case 3 : // multiplication operation(3); break; case 7 : // division operation(4); break; case 13: doublezero(); break; case 14 : decimal(); break; case 16: mem(); break; case 20: recallmem(); break; case 19: plusminus(); break; case 17: plusm(); break; case 18: minusm(); break; case 21: clearm(); break; case 22 : square(); break; case 23: sqroot(); break; case 24: // OFF hidemouseptr(); setcolor(1); for(j=0;j<20;j++) { for(i=75;i<481;i+=20) line(0,0+i+j,640,j+0+i); delay(100); } setcolor(14); outtextxy(225,200,"Thanks for using it !"); delay(2000); setcolor(13); for(j=0;j<20;j++) { for(i=0;i<640;i+=20) line(0+i+j,0,j+0+i,640); delay(100); } setcolor(1); for(i=0;i<25;i++) { outtextxy(75+10*i,200,text1[i]); sound(3000); delay(50); nosound(); } for(i=0;i<29;i++) { outtextxy(125+10*i,225,text2[i]); sound(3000); delay(50); nosound(); } delay(2500); sound(5000); delay(10); exit(); break; case 25: allclear(); break; case 26: clear(); break; case 27: // equalto operation(5); break; } setcolor(1); outtextxy(x1+12,y1+7,text[j*4+i]); } } x1+=60; x2+=60; } } } } void normalbutton(int x1,int x2,int y1,int y2,char **text) { setcolor(15); rectangle(x1-2,y1-2,x2+1,y2+1); rectangle(x1-1,y1-1,x2+2,y2+2); setcolor(7); rectangle(x1,y1,x2+2,y2+2); rectangle(x1,y1,x2+1,y2+1); setfillstyle(SOLID_FILL,14); bar(x1,y1,x2,y2); setcolor(1); outtextxy(x1+12,y1+7,text[k]); k++; } /* initmouse */ initmouse() { i.x.ax=0; int86 (0x33,&i,&o); return(o.x.ax); } hidemouseptr() { i.x.ax=2; int86(0x33,&i,&o); } /* displays mouse pointer */ showmouseptr() { i.x.ax=1; int86(0x33,&i,&o); return 0; } /*gets mouse coordinates and button status*/ getmousepos(int *button,int *x,int *y) { i.x.ax=3; int86(0x33,&i,&o); *button=o.x.bx; *x=o.x.cx; *y=o.x.dx; return 0; } /* Move mouse ptr to x,y */ movemouseptr(int *x,int *y) { i.x.ax=4; int86(0x33,&i,&o); o.x.cx=*x; o.x.dx=*y; return 0; } addnum(int pass) { if(sq) newnum=1; if(newnum) { if(d) { num=pass/(pow(10.0,d)); d++; newnum=0; } else { num=pass; newnum=0; } } else { /* if(num==0) { if(d) { num=num+pass/(pow(10.0,d)); d++; } else num=pass; } */ // else { if(d) { if(num<0) num=num-pass/(pow(10.0,d)); else num=num+pass/(pow(10.0,d)); d++; } else { num=num*10+pass; } } } printf("%25.5Lf",num); } operation(int opr) { long double pnum; pnum=num; if(newnum && (prop != 5) && memo) { } else { newnum=1; d=0; sq=0; switch(prop) { case 1: accum=accum+pnum; break; case 2: accum=accum-pnum; break; case 3: accum=accum*pnum; break; case 4: accum=accum/pnum; break; default: accum=pnum; } } prop=opr; num=accum; printf("%25.5Lf",num); } allclear() { sq=0; accum=0; num=0; d=0; newnum=1; printf("%25.5Lf",num); } mem() { m=num; } recallmem() { memo=0; printf("%25.5Lf",m); num=m; } plusminus() { if(num!=0) { num*=-1; printf("%25.5Lf",num); } } plusm() { m+=num; } minusm() { m-=num; } clearm() { m=0; } decimal() { if(!d) {d=1; if(newnum==1) { num=0; } printf("%25.5Lf",num); } } square() { sq=1; num*=num; printf("%25.5Lf",num); // newnum=1; } sqroot() { sq=1; num=pow(num,0.5); printf("%25.5Lf",num); // newnum=1; } doublezero() { if(d) { // num=num+pass/(pow(100.0,d)); d++; d++; } else num*=100; printf("%25.5Lf",num); } clear() { num=0; printf("%25.5Lf",num); }
Goto Statement in C
A goto statement in C programming language provides an unconditional jump from the 'goto' to a labeled statement in the same function. The goto statement is known as jump statement in C. As the name suggests, goto is used to transfer the program control to a predefined label. The goto statment can be used to repeat some part of the code for a particular condition. It can also be used to break the multiple loops which can't be done by using a single break statement.
Syntax for Goto Statement in C
label: //some part of the code; goto label;
Use of goto statement is highly discouraged in any programming language because it makes difficult to trace the control flow of a program, making the program hard to understand and hard to modify. Any program that uses a goto can be rewritten to avoid them.
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/* transfer control of the program to the specified label by goto statement example */ // Program to calculate the sum and average of positive numbers // If the user enters a negative number, the sum and average are displayed. #include <stdio.h> int main() { const int maxInput = 100; int i; double number, average, sum = 0.0; for (i = 1; i <= maxInput; ++i) { printf("%d. Enter a number: ", i); scanf("%lf", &number); // go to jump if the user enters a negative number if (number < 0.0) { goto jump; } sum += number; } jump: average = sum / (i - 1); printf("Sum = %.2f\n", sum); printf("Average = %.2f", average); return 0; }
printf() Function in C
Writes the C string pointed by format to the standard output (stdout). If format includes format specifiers (subsequences beginning with %), the additional arguments following format are formatted and inserted in the resulting string replacing their respective specifiers. printf format string refers to a control parameter used by a class of functions in the input/output libraries of C programming language. The string is written in a simple template language: characters are usually copied literally into the function's output, but format specifiers, which start with a % character, indicate the location and method to translate a piece of data (such as a number) to characters. "printf" is the name of one of the main C output functions, and stands for "print formatted". printf format strings are complementary to scanf format strings, which provide formatted input (parsing). In both cases these provide simple functionality and fixed format compared to more sophisticated and flexible template engines or parsers, but are sufficient for many purposes.
Syntax for printf() function in C
#include <stdio.h> int printf ( const char * format, ... );
format
C string that contains the text to be written to stdout. It can optionally contain embedded format specifiers that are replaced by the values specified in subsequent additional arguments and formatted as requested. A format specifier follows this prototype: [see compatibility note below] %[flags][width][.precision][length]specifier Where the specifier character at the end is the most significant component, since it defines the type and the interpretation of its corresponding argument:
specifier
a conversion format specifier.
d or i
Signed decimal integer
u
Unsigned decimal integer
o
Unsigned octal
x
Unsigned hexadecimal integer
X
Unsigned hexadecimal integer (uppercase)
f
Decimal floating point, lowercase
F
Decimal floating point, uppercase
e
Scientific notation (mantissa/exponent), lowercase
E
Scientific notation (mantissa/exponent), uppercase
g
Use the shortest representation: %e or %f
G
Use the shortest representation: %E or %F
a
Hexadecimal floating point, lowercase
A
Hexadecimal floating point, uppercase
c
Character
s
String of characters
p
Pointer address
n
Nothing printed. The corresponding argument must be a pointer to a signed int. The number of characters written so far is stored in the pointed location.
%
A % followed by another % character will write a single % to the stream. The format specifier can also contain sub-specifiers: flags, width, .precision and modifiers (in that order), which are optional and follow these specifications:
flags
one or more flags that modifies the conversion behavior (optional)
-
Left-justify within the given field width; Right justification is the default (see width sub-specifier).
+
Forces to preceed the result with a plus or minus sign (+ or -) even for positive numbers. By default, only negative numbers are preceded with a - sign.
(space)
If no sign is going to be written, a blank space is inserted before the value.
#
Used with o, x or X specifiers the value is preceeded with 0, 0x or 0X respectively for values different than zero. Used with a, A, e, E, f, F, g or G it forces the written output to contain a decimal point even if no more digits follow. By default, if no digits follow, no decimal point is written.
0
Left-pads the number with zeroes (0) instead of spaces when padding is specified (see width sub-specifier).
width
an optional * or integer value used to specify minimum width field.
(number)
Minimum number of characters to be printed. If the value to be printed is shorter than this number, the result is padded with blank spaces. The value is not truncated even if the result is larger.
*
The width is not specified in the format string, but as an additional integer value argument preceding the argument that has to be formatted.
.precision
an optional field consisting of a . followed by * or integer or nothing to specify the precision.
.number
For integer specifiers (d, i, o, u, x, X): precision specifies the minimum number of digits to be written. If the value to be written is shorter than this number, the result is padded with leading zeros. The value is not truncated even if the result is longer. A precision of 0 means that no character is written for the value 0. For a, A, e, E, f and F specifiers: this is the number of digits to be printed after the decimal point (by default, this is 6). For g and G specifiers: This is the maximum number of significant digits to be printed. For s: this is the maximum number of characters to be printed. By default all characters are printed until the ending null character is encountered. If the period is specified without an explicit value for precision, 0 is assumed.
.*
The precision is not specified in the format string, but as an additional integer value argument preceding the argument that has to be formatted.
length
an optional length modifier that specifies the size of the argument.
... (additional arguments)
Depending on the format string, the function may expect a sequence of additional arguments, each containing a value to be used to replace a format specifier in the format string (or a pointer to a storage location, for n). There should be at least as many of these arguments as the number of values specified in the format specifiers. Additional arguments are ignored by the function. If a writing error occurs, the error indicator (ferror) is set and a negative number is returned. If a multibyte character encoding error occurs while writing wide characters, errno is set to EILSEQ and a negative number is returned.
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/* print formatted data to stdout by printf() function example */ #include <stdio.h> int main() { char ch; char str[100]; int a; float b; printf("Enter any character \n"); scanf("%c", &ch); printf("Entered character is %c \n", ch); printf("Enter any string ( upto 100 character ) \n"); scanf("%s", &str); printf("Entered string is %s \n", str); printf("Enter integer and then a float: "); // Taking multiple inputs scanf("%d%f", &a, &b); printf("You entered %d and %f", a, b); return 0; }
If Else If Ladder in C/C++
The if...else statement executes two different codes depending upon whether the test expression is true or false. Sometimes, a choice has to be made from more than 2 possibilities. The if...else ladder allows you to check between multiple test expressions and execute different statements. In C/C++ if-else-if ladder helps user decide from among multiple options. The C/C++ if statements are executed from the top down. As soon as one of the conditions controlling the if is true, the statement associated with that if is executed, and the rest of the C else-if ladder is bypassed. If none of the conditions is true, then the final else statement will be executed.
Syntax of if...else Ladder in C
if (Condition1) { Statement1; } else if(Condition2) { Statement2; } . . . else if(ConditionN) { StatementN; } else { Default_Statement; }
In the above syntax of if-else-if, if the Condition1 is TRUE then the Statement1 will be executed and control goes to next statement in the program following if-else-if ladder. If Condition1 is FALSE then Condition2 will be checked, if Condition2 is TRUE then Statement2 will be executed and control goes to next statement in the program following if-else-if ladder. Similarly, if Condition2 is FALSE then next condition will be checked and the process continues. If all the conditions in the if-else-if ladder are evaluated to FALSE, then Default_Statement will be executed.
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/* write a C program which demonstrate use of if-else-if ladder statement */ #include<stdio.h> #include<conio.h> void main() { int a; printf("Enter a Number: "); scanf("%d",&a); if(a > 0) { printf("Given Number is Positive"); } else if(a == 0) { printf("Given Number is Zero"); } else if(a < 0) { printf("Given Number is Negative"); } getch(); }
setcolor() Function in C
setcolor() function is used to set the foreground color in graphics mode. After resetting the foreground color you will get the text or any other shape which you want to draw in that color. setcolor sets the current drawing color to color, which can range from 0 to getmaxcolor. The current drawing color is the value to which pixels are set when lines, and so on are drawn. The drawing colors shown below are available for the CGA and EGA, respectively.
Syntax for setcolor() Function in C
#include <graphics.h> void setcolor(int color);
Each color is assigned a number. The possible color values are from 0 - 15: • BLACK – 0 • BLUE – 1 • GREEN – 2 • CYAN – 3 • RED – 4 • MAGENTA – 5 • BROWN – 6 • LIGHTGRAY – 7 • DARKGRAY – 8 • LIGHTBLUE – 9 • LIGHTGREEN – 10 • LIGHTCYAN – 11 • LIGHTRED – 12 • LIGHTMAGENTA – 13 • YELLOW – 14 • WHITE – 15 setcolor() functions contains only one argument that is color. It may be the color name enumerated in graphics.h header file or number assigned with that color.
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/* set the current drawing color to color, which can range from 0 to getmaxcolor by setcolor() function example */ // C Implementation for setcolor() #include <graphics.h> #include <stdio.h> // driver code int main() { // gm is Graphics mode which is // a computer display mode that // generates image using pixels. // DETECT is a macro defined in // "graphics.h" header file int gd = DETECT, gm, color; // initgraph initializes the // graphics system by loading a // graphics driver from disk initgraph(&gd, &gm, ""); // Draws circle in white color // center at (100, 100) and radius // as 50 circle(100, 100, 50); // setcolor function setcolor(GREEN); // Draws circle in green color // center at (200, 200) and radius // as 50 circle(200, 200, 50); getch(); // closegraph function closes the // graphics mode and deallocates // all memory allocated by // graphics system . closegraph(); return 0; }
Switch Case Statement in C
Switch statement in C tests the value of a variable and compares it with multiple cases. Once the case match is found, a block of statements associated with that particular case is executed. Each case in a block of a switch has a different name/number which is referred to as an identifier. The value provided by the user is compared with all the cases inside the switch block until the match is found. If a case match is NOT found, then the default statement is executed, and the control goes out of the switch block.
Syntax for Switch Case Statement in C
switch(expression) { case constant-expression : statement(s); break; /* optional */ case constant-expression : statement(s); break; /* optional */ /* you can have any number of case statements */ default : /* Optional */ statement(s); }
• The expression used in a switch statement must have an integral or enumerated type, or be of a class type in which the class has a single conversion function to an integral or enumerated type. • You can have any number of case statements within a switch. Each case is followed by the value to be compared to and a colon. • The constant-expression for a case must be the same data type as the variable in the switch, and it must be a constant or a literal. • When the variable being switched on is equal to a case, the statements following that case will execute until a break statement is reached. • When a break statement is reached, the switch terminates, and the flow of control jumps to the next line following the switch statement. • Not every case needs to contain a break. If no break appears, the flow of control will fall through to subsequent cases until a break is reached. • A switch statement can have an optional default case, which must appear at the end of the switch. The default case can be used for performing a task when none of the cases is true. No break is needed in the default case.
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/* switch case statement in C language*/ // Program to create a simple calculator #include <stdio.h> int main() { char operation; double n1, n2; printf("Enter an operator (+, -, *, /): "); scanf("%c", &operation); printf("Enter two operands: "); scanf("%lf %lf",&n1, &n2); switch(operation) { case '+': printf("%.1lf + %.1lf = %.1lf",n1, n2, n1+n2); break; case '-': printf("%.1lf - %.1lf = %.1lf",n1, n2, n1-n2); break; case '*': printf("%.1lf * %.1lf = %.1lf",n1, n2, n1*n2); break; case '/': printf("%.1lf / %.1lf = %.1lf",n1, n2, n1/n2); break; // operator doesn't match any case constant +, -, *, / default: printf("Error! operator is not correct"); } return 0; }
If Else Statement in C
The if-else statement is used to perform two operations for a single condition. The if-else statement is an extension to the if statement using which, we can perform two different operations, i.e., one is for the correctness of that condition, and the other is for the incorrectness of the condition. Here, we must notice that if and else block cannot be executed simiulteneously. Using if-else statement is always preferable since it always invokes an otherwise case with every if condition.
Syntax for if-else Statement in C
if (test expression) { // run code if test expression is true } else { // run code if test expression is false }
If the test expression is evaluated to true, • statements inside the body of if are executed. • statements inside the body of else are skipped from execution. If the test expression is evaluated to false, • statements inside the body of else are executed • statements inside the body of if are skipped from execution.
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/* if else statement in C language */ // Check whether an integer is odd or even #include <stdio.h> int main() { int number; printf("Enter an integer: "); scanf("%d", &number); // True if the remainder is 0 if (number%2 == 0) { printf("%d is an even integer.",number); } else { printf("%d is an odd integer.",number); } return 0; }
Nested Loop Statement in C
C supports nesting of loops in C. Nesting of loops is the feature in C that allows the looping of statements inside another loop. Any number of loops can be defined inside another loop, i.e., there is no restriction for defining any number of loops. The nesting level can be defined at n times. You can define any type of loop inside another loop; for example, you can define 'while' loop inside a 'for' loop. A loop inside another loop is called a nested loop. The depth of nested loop depends on the complexity of a problem. We can have any number of nested loops as required. Consider a nested loop where the outer loop runs n times and consists of another loop inside it. The inner loop runs m times. Then, the total number of times the inner loop runs during the program execution is n*m.
Syntax for Nested Loop Statement in C
Outer_loop { Inner_loop { // inner loop statements. } // outer loop statements. }
Outer_loop and Inner_loop are the valid loops that can be a 'for' loop, 'while' loop or 'do-while' loop.
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/* nested loop statement in C language */ // C Program to print all prime factors // of a number using nested loop #include <math.h> #include <stdio.h> // A function to print all prime factors of a given number n void primeFactors(int n) { // Print the number of 2s that divide n while (n % 2 == 0) { printf("%d ", 2); n = n / 2; } // n must be odd at this point. So we can skip // one element (Note i = i +2) for (int i = 3; i <= sqrt(n); i = i + 2) { // While i divides n, print i and divide n while (n % i == 0) { printf("%d ", i); n = n / i; } } // This condition is to handle the case when n // is a prime number greater than 2 if (n > 2) printf("%d ", n); } /* Driver program to test above function */ int main() { int n = 315; primeFactors(n); return 0; }
bar() Function in C
bar() function is a C graphics function that is used to draw graphics in the C programming language. The graphics.h header contains functions that work for drawing graphics. The bar() function is also defined in the header file. The bar() function is used to draw a bar ( of bar graph) which is a 2-dimensional figure. It is filled rectangular figure. The function takes four arguments that are the coordinates of (X, Y) coordinates of the top-left corner of the bar {left and top } and (X, Y) coordinates of the bottom-right corner of the bar {right and bottom}.
Syntax for bar() Function in C
#include <graphics.h> void bar(int left, int top, int right, int bottom);
left
X coordinate of top left corner.
top
Y coordinate of top left corner.
right
X coordinate of bottom right corner.
bottom
Y coordinate of bottom right corner. Current fill pattern and fill color is used to fill the bar. To change fill pattern and fill color use setfillstyle.
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/* draw a 2-dimensional, rectangular filled in bar by bar() function example */ // C implementation of bar() function #include <graphics.h> // driver code int main() { // gm is Graphics mode which is // a computer display mode that // generates image using pixels. // DETECT is a macro defined in // "graphics.h" header file int gd = DETECT, gm; // initgraph initializes the // graphics system by loading a // graphics driver from disk initgraph(&gd, &gm, ""); // location of sides int left, top, right, bottom; // left, top, right, bottom denotes // location of rectangular bar bar(left = 150, top = 150, right = 190, bottom = 350); bar(left = 220, top = 250, right = 260, bottom = 350); bar(left = 290, top = 200, right = 330, bottom = 350); // y axis line line(100, 50, 100, 350); // x axis line line(100, 350, 400, 350); getch(); // closegraph function closes the // graphics mode and deallocates // all memory allocated by // graphics system . closegraph(); return 0; }
nosound() Function in C
The nosound() function in C language is used to stop the sound played by sound() function. nosound() function is simply silent the system. Sound function produces the sound of a specified frequency and nosound function turn off the PC speaker.
Syntax for nosound() Function in C
#include <dos.h> void nosound();
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/* silent the system by nosound() function example */ #include <stdio.h> //to use 'sound()', 'delay()' functions #include <dos.h> int main() { //calling the function for producing //the sound of frequency 400. sound(400); //function to delay the sound for //half of second. delay(500); //calling the function for producing //the sound of frequency 250. sound(250); //function to delay the sound for //half of second. delay(500); //calling the function to stop the //system sound. nosound(); return 0; }
Assignment Operators in C
Assignment operators are used to assign the value, variable and function to another variable. Assignment operators in C are some of the C Programming Operator, which are useful to assign the values to the declared variables. Let's discuss the various types of the assignment operators such as =, +=, -=, /=, *= and %=. The following table lists the assignment operators supported by the C language:
=
Simple assignment operator. Assigns values from right side operands to left side operand
+=
Add AND assignment operator. It adds the right operand to the left operand and assign the result to the left operand.
-=
Subtract AND assignment operator. It subtracts the right operand from the left operand and assigns the result to the left operand.
*=
Multiply AND assignment operator. It multiplies the right operand with the left operand and assigns the result to the left operand.
/=
Divide AND assignment operator. It divides the left operand with the right operand and assigns the result to the left operand.
%=
Modulus AND assignment operator. It takes modulus using two operands and assigns the result to the left operand.
<<=
Left shift AND assignment operator.
>>=
Right shift AND assignment operator.
&=
Bitwise AND assignment operator.
^=
Bitwise exclusive OR and assignment operator.
|=
Bitwise inclusive OR and assignment operator.
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/* assignment operators in C language */ #include <stdio.h> main() { int a = 23; int c ; c = a; printf("Line 1 - = Operator Example, Value of c = %d\n", c ); c += a; printf("Line 2 - += Operator Example, Value of c = %d\n", c ); c -= a; printf("Line 3 - -= Operator Example, Value of c = %d\n", c ); c *= a; printf("Line 4 - *= Operator Example, Value of c = %d\n", c ); c /= a; printf("Line 5 - /= Operator Example, Value of c = %d\n", c ); c = 120; c %= a; printf("Line 6 - %= Operator Example, Value of c = %d\n", c ); c <<= 2; printf("Line 7 - <<= Operator Example, Value of c = %d\n", c ); c >>= 2; printf("Line 8 - >>= Operator Example, Value of c = %d\n", c ); c &= 2; printf("Line 9 - &= Operator Example, Value of c = %d\n", c ); c ^= 2; printf("Line 10 - ^= Operator Example, Value of c = %d\n", c ); c |= 2; printf("Line 11 - |= Operator Example, Value of c = %d\n", c ); }
Math pow() Function in C
Raise to power. Returns base raised to the power exponent: baseexponent. The function pow() is used to calculate the power raised to the base value. It takes two arguments. It returns the power raised to the base value. It is declared in "math.h" header file.
Syntax for pow() Function in C
#include <math.h> double pow(double x, double y)
x
This is the floating point base value.
y
This is the floating point power value. This function returns the result of raising x to the power y. (xy) If the base is finite negative and the exponent is finite but not an integer value, it causes a domain error. If both base and exponent are zero, it may also cause a domain error on certain implementations. If base is zero and exponent is negative, it may cause a domain error or a pole error (or none, depending on the library implementation). The function may also cause a range error if the result is too great or too small to be represented by a value of the return type.
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/* return the power raised to the base number by pow() function example */ #include <stdio.h> // import the library #include <math.h> // the main function int main() { // first example double no1 = 5; double no1Exponent = 4.0; // second example double no2 = 1.0; double no2Exponent = 0; // third example double no3 = -20.00; double no3Exponent = -3; // generating results with the "pow()" method double no1Result = pow(no1, no1Exponent); double no2Result = pow(no2, no2Exponent); double no3Result = pow(no3, no3Exponent); // Printing the results printf("%lf to the power of %lf is : %lf\n", no1,no1Exponent, no1Result); printf("%lf to the power of %lf is : %lf\n", no2,no2Exponent, no2Result); printf("%lf to the power of %lf is : %lf\n", no3,no3Exponent, no3Result); return 0; }
closegraph() Function in C
The header file graphics.h contains closegraph() function which closes the graphics mode, deallocates all memory allocated by graphics system and restores the screen to the mode it was in before you called initgraph. closegraph() function is used to re-enter in the text mode and exit from the graphics mode. If you want to use both text mode and graphics mode in the program then you have to use both initgraph() and closegraph() function in the program.
Syntax for closegraph() Function in C
#include <graphics.h> void closegraph();
This function does not return any value.
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/* deallocate all memory allocated by the graphics system by closegraph() function example */ // C Implementation for closegraph() #include <graphics.h> // driver code int main() { // gm is Graphics mode which is // a computer display mode that // generates image using pixels. // DETECT is a macro defined in // "graphics.h" header file int gd = DETECT, gm; // initgraph initializes the // graphics system by loading a // graphics driver from disk initgraph(&gd, &gm, ""); // outtext function displays // text at current position. outtext("Press any key to close" " the graphics mode !!"); getch(); // closegraph function closes the // graphics mode and deallocates // all memory allocated by // graphics system . closegraph(); return 0; }
setbkcolor() Function in C
setbkcolor() function is used to set the background color in graphics mode. The default background color is black and default drawing color as we know is white. setbkcolor() function takes only one argument it would be either the name of color defined in graphics.h header file or number associated with those colors. If we write setbkcolor(yellow) it changes the background color in Green.
Syntax for setbkcolor() Function in C
#include <graphics.h> void setbkcolor(int color);
possible color values
• BLACK – 0 • BLUE – 1 • GREEN – 2 • CYAN – 3 • RED – 4 • MAGENTA – 5 • BROWN – 6 • LIGHTGRAY – 7 • DARKGRAY – 8 • LIGHTBLUE – 9 • LIGHTGREEN – 10 • LIGHTCYAN – 11 • LIGHTRED – 12 • LIGHTMAGENTA – 13 • YELLOW – 14 • WHITE – 15 On CGA and EGA systems, setbkcolor changes the background color by changing the first entry in the palette. If you use an EGA or a VGA, and you change the palette colors with setpalette or setallpalette, the defined symbolic constants might not give you the correct color. This is because the parameter to setbkcolor indicates the entry number in the current palette rather than a specific color (unless the parameter passed is 0, which always sets the background color to black).
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/* set the background to the color specified by color by setbkcolor() function example */ #include <graphics.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <conio.h> int main(void) { /* _select driver and mode that supports multiple background colors*/ int gdriver = EGA, gmode = EGAHI, errorcode; int bkcol, maxcolor, x, y; char msg[80]; /* initialize graphics and local variables */ initgraph(&gdriver, &gmode, ""); /* read result of initialization */ errorcode = graphresult(); if (errorcode != grOk) { /* an error occurred */ printf("Graphics error: %s\n", grapherrormsg(errorcode)); printf("Press any key to halt:"); getch(); exit(1); /* terminate with an error code */ } /* maximum color index supported */ maxcolor = getmaxcolor(); /* for centering text messages */ settextjustify(CENTER_TEXT, CENTER_TEXT); x = getmaxx() / 2; y = getmaxy() / 2; /* loop through the available colors */ for (bkcol=0; bkcol<=maxcolor; bkcol++) { /* clear the screen */ cleardevice(); /* select a new background color */ setbkcolor(bkcol); /* output a messsage */ if (bkcol == WHITE) setcolor(EGA_BLUE); sprintf(msg, "Background color: %d", bkcol); outtextxy(x, y, msg); getch(); } /* clean up */ closegraph(); return 0; }
For Loop Statement in C
The for loop is used in the case where we need to execute some part of the code until the given condition is satisfied. The for loop is also called as a per-tested loop. It is better to use for loop if the number of iteration is known in advance. The for-loop statement is a very specialized while loop, which increases the readability of a program. It is frequently used to traverse the data structures like the array and linked list.
Syntax of For Loop Statement in C
for (initialization; condition test; increment or decrement) { //Statements to be executed repeatedly }
Step 1
First initialization happens and the counter variable gets initialized.
Step 2
In the second step the condition is checked, where the counter variable is tested for the given condition, if the condition returns true then the C statements inside the body of for loop gets executed, if the condition returns false then the for loop gets terminated and the control comes out of the loop.
Step 3
After successful execution of statements inside the body of loop, the counter variable is incremented or decremented, depending on the operation (++ or --).
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/* for loop statement in C language */ // Program to calculate the sum of first n natural numbers // Positive integers 1,2,3...n are known as natural numbers #include <stdio.h> int main() { int num, count, sum = 0; printf("Enter a positive integer: "); scanf("%d", &num); // for loop terminates when num is less than count for(count = 1; count <= num; ++count) { sum += count; } printf("Sum = %d", sum); return 0; }
Logical Operators in C
An expression containing logical operator returns either 0 or 1 depending upon whether expression results true or false. Logical operators are commonly used in decision making in C programming. These operators are used to perform logical operations and used with conditional statements like C if-else statements.
&&
Called Logical AND operator. If both the operands are non-zero, then the condition becomes true.
||
Called Logical OR Operator. If any of the two operands is non-zero, then the condition becomes true.
!
Called Logical NOT Operator. It is used to reverse the logical state of its operand. If a condition is true, then Logical NOT operator will make it false.
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/* logical operators in C language */ #include <stdio.h> main() { int a = 4; int b = 23; int c ; if ( a && b ) { printf("Line 1 - Condition is true\n" ); } if ( a || b ) { printf("Line 2 - Condition is true\n" ); } /* lets change the value of a and b */ a = 2; b = 8; if ( a && b ) { printf("Line 3 - Condition is true\n" ); } else { printf("Line 3 - Condition is not true\n" ); } if ( !(a && b) ) { printf("Line 4 - Condition is true\n" ); } }
While Loop Statement in C
While loop is also known as a pre-tested loop. In general, a while loop allows a part of the code to be executed multiple times depending upon a given boolean condition. It can be viewed as a repeating if statement. The while loop is mostly used in the case where the number of iterations is not known in advance. The while loop evaluates the test expression inside the parentheses (). If test expression is true, statements inside the body of while loop are executed. Then, test expression is evaluated again. The process goes on until test expression is evaluated to false. If test expression is false, the loop terminates.
Syntax of While Loop Statement in C
while (testExpression) { // the body of the loop }
• The while loop evaluates the testExpression inside the parentheses (). • If testExpression is true, statements inside the body of while loop are executed. Then, testExpression is evaluated again. • The process goes on until testExpression is evaluated to false. • If testExpression is false, the loop terminates (ends).
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/* while loop statement in C language */ #include<stdio.h> int main() { int n, num, sum = 0, remainder; printf("Enter a number: "); scanf("%d", &n); num = n; // keep looping while n > 0 while( n > 0 ) { remainder = n % 10; // get the last digit of n sum += remainder; // add the remainder to the sum n /= 10; // remove the last digit from n } printf("Sum of digits of %d is %d", num, sum); // signal to operating system everything works fine return 0; }
Break Statement in C
The break is a keyword in C which is used to bring the program control out of the loop. The break statement is used inside loops or switch statement. The break statement breaks the loop one by one, i.e., in the case of nested loops, it breaks the inner loop first and then proceeds to outer loops.
Syntax for Break Statement in C
//loop statement... break;
When a break statement is encountered inside a loop, the loop is immediately terminated and the program control resumes at the next statement following the loop. It can be used to terminate a case in the switch statement (covered in the next chapter). If you are using nested loops, the break statement will stop the execution of the innermost loop and start executing the next line of code after the block.
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/* bring the program control out of the loop by break keyword */ // Program to calculate the sum of numbers (10 numbers max) // If the user enters a negative number, the loop terminates #include <stdio.h> int main() { int i; double number, sum = 0.0; for (i = 1; i <= 10; ++i) { printf("Enter n%d: ", i); scanf("%lf", &number); // if the user enters a negative number, break the loop if (number < 0.0) { break; } sum += number; // sum = sum + number; } printf("Sum = %.2lf", sum); return 0; }
outtextxy() Function in C
outtextxy displays a text string in the viewport at the given position (x, y), using the current justification settings and the current font, direction, and size. To maintain code compatibility when using several fonts, use textwidth and textheight to determine the dimensions of the string. If a string is printed with the default font using outtext or outtextxy, any part of the string that extends outside the current viewport is truncated. outtextxy is for use in graphics mode; it will not work in text mode.
Syntax for outtextxy() Function in C
#include <graphics.h> void outtextxy(int x, int y, char *textstring);
x
x-coordinate of the point
y
y-coordinate of the point
textstring
string to be displayed where, x, y are coordinates of the point and, third argument contains the address of string to be displayed. This function does not return any value.
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/* display the text or string at a specified point (x, y) on the screen by outtextxy() function example */ // C Implementation for outtextxy() #include <graphics.h> // driver code int main() { // gm is Graphics mode which is // a computer display mode that // generates image using pixels. // DETECT is a macro defined in // "graphics.h" header file int gd = DETECT, gm; // initgraph initializes the // graphics system by loading a // graphics driver from disk initgraph(&gd, &gm, ""); // outtextxy function outtextxy(200, 150, "Hello, Have a good day !"); getch(); // closegraph function closes the // graphics mode and deallocates // all memory allocated by // graphics system . closegraph(); return 0; }
initgraph() Function in C
initgraph initializes the graphics system by loading a graphics driver from disk (or validating a registered driver), and putting the system into graphics mode. To start the graphics system, first call the initgraph function. initgraph loads the graphics driver and puts the system into graphics mode. You can tell initgraph to use a particular graphics driver and mode, or to autodetect the attached video adapter at run time and pick the corresponding driver. If you tell initgraph to autodetect, it calls detectgraph to select a graphics driver and mode. initgraph also resets all graphics settings to their defaults (current position, palette, color, viewport, and so on) and resets graphresult to 0. Normally, initgraph loads a graphics driver by allocating memory for the driver (through _graphgetmem), then loading the appropriate .BGI file from disk. As an alternative to this dynamic loading scheme, you can link a graphics driver file (or several of them) directly into your executable program file.
Syntax for initgraph() Function in C
#include <graphics.h> void initgraph(int *graphdriver, int *graphmode, char *pathtodriver);
pathtodriver
pathtodriver specifies the directory path where initgraph looks for graphics drivers. initgraph first looks in the path specified in pathtodriver, then (if they are not there) in the current directory. Accordingly, if pathtodriver is null, the driver files (*.BGI) must be in the current directory. This is also the path settextstyle searches for the stroked character font files (*.CHR).
graphdriver
graphdriver is an integer that specifies the graphics driver to be used. You can give it a value using a constant of the graphics_drivers enumeration type, which is defined in graphics.h and listed below. • DETECT – 0 (requests autodetect) • CGA – 1 • MCGA – 2 • EGA – 3 • EGA64 – 4 • EGAMONO – 5 • IBM8514 – 6 • HERCMONO – 7 • ATT400 – 8 • VGA – 9 • PC3270 – 10
graphmode
graphmode is an integer that specifies the initial graphics mode (unless *graphdriver equals DETECT; in which case, *graphmode is set by initgraph to the highest resolution available for the detected driver). You can give *graphmode a value using a constant of the graphics_modes enumeration type, which is defined in graphics.h and listed below. initgraph always sets the internal error code; on success, it sets the code to 0. If an error occurred, *graphdriver is set to -2, -3, -4, or -5, and graphresult returns the same value as listed below: • grNotDetected: -2 Cannot detect a graphics card • grFileNotFound: -3 Cannot find driver file • grInvalidDriver: -4 Invalid driver • grNoLoadMem: -5 Insufficient memory to load driver
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/* initgraph initializes the graphics system by loading a graphics driver by initgraph() function example*/ #include <graphics.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <conio.h> int main(void) { /* request auto detection */ int gdriver = DETECT, gmode, errorcode; /* initialize graphics mode */ initgraph(&gdriver, &gmode, ""); /* read result of initialization */ errorcode = graphresult(); if (errorcode != grOk) /* an error occurred */ { printf("Graphics error: %s\n", grapherrormsg(errorcode)); printf("Press any key to halt:"); getch(); exit(1); /* return with error code */ } /* draw a line */ line(0, 0, getmaxx(), getmaxy()); /* clean up */ getch(); closegraph(); return 0; }
exit() Function in C
The exit() function is used to terminate a process or function calling immediately in the program. It means any open file or function belonging to the process is closed immediately as the exit() function occurred in the program. The exit() function is the standard library function of the C, which is defined in the stdlib.h header file. So, we can say it is the function that forcefully terminates the current program and transfers the control to the operating system to exit the program. The exit(0) function determines the program terminates without any error message, and then the exit(1) function determines the program forcefully terminates the execution process.
Syntax for exit() Function in C
#include <stdlib.h> void exit(int status)
status
Status code. If this is 0 or EXIT_SUCCESS, it indicates success. If it is EXIT_FAILURE, it indicates failure. The exit function does not return anything. • We must include the stdlib.h header file while using the exit () function. • It is used to terminate the normal execution of the program while encountered the exit () function. • The exit () function calls the registered atexit() function in the reverse order of their registration. • We can use the exit() function to flush or clean all open stream data like read or write with unwritten buffered data. • It closed all opened files linked with a parent or another function or file and can remove all files created by the tmpfile function. • The program's behaviour is undefined if the user calls the exit function more than one time or calls the exit and quick_exit function. • The exit function is categorized into two parts: exit(0) and exit(1).
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/* call all functions registered with atexit and terminates the program by exit() function example */ #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> int main () { // declaration of the variables int i, num; printf ( " Enter the last number: "); scanf ( " %d", &num); for ( i = 1; i<num; i++) { // use if statement to check the condition if ( i == 6 ) /* use exit () statement with passing 0 argument to show termination of the program without any error message. */ exit(0); else printf (" \n Number is %d", i); } return 0; }
delay() Function in C
Delay function is used to suspend execution of a program for a particular time. delay() function requires a parameter which should be a number, defining the milliseconds for the delay. To use delay function in your program you should include the "dos.h" header file which is not a part of standard C library. Here unsigned int is the number of milliseconds (remember 1 second = 1000 milliseconds).
Syntax for delay() Function in C
#include<stdio.h> void delay(unsigned int);
sleep() function requires a parameter which should be a number, defining the seconds to sleep. These functions are pretty useful when you want to show the user multiple outputs, for a given period of time. The nice thing about this is that we can also make alarm and reminder for the user in our program. Hence, these two functions are pretty handy, if you are planning to make a real-world application.
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/* suspend execution of a program for a particular time by delay() function example */ #include <stdio.h> //to use 'delay()' #include <dos.h> int main() { // message for user printf("After printing this message the program will get end in next 5 seconds \n"); // delay the process for 5 seconds as it takes integer value in milliseconds. delay(5000); // message for user. printf("After printing this message the program will get delay for next 15 seconds\n"); // to terminate the process for next 15 seconds. sleep(15); // message for user printf("After printing this message the program will get end in next 2 seconds \n"); // delay the process for 2 seconds as it takes integer value in milliseconds. delay(2000); return 0; }
sound() Function in C
Our system can create various sounds on different frequencies. The sound() is very useful as it can create very nice music with the help of programming and our user can enjoy music during working in out the program. Sound function produces the sound of a specified frequency. Used for adding music to a C program, try to use some random values in loop, vary delay and enjoy.
Syntax for sound() Function in C
#include <dos.h> void sound(unsigned frequency);
The delay() function has been used in this function to delay for the next sound. The Second thing is the nosound() function, which simply silent the system. These two functions are from file dos.h, which should be included in the program.
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/* produce the sound of a specified frequency by sound() function example */ #include <stdio.h> //to use 'sound()', 'delay()' functions #include <dos.h> int main() { //calling the function for producing //the sound of frequency 400. sound(400); //function to delay the sound for //half of second. delay(500); //the sound of frequency 200. sound(200); //the sound of frequency 500. sound(500); //calling the function to stop the //system sound. nosound(); return 0; }
setfillstyle() Function in C
The header file graphics.h contains setfillstyle() function which sets the current fill pattern and fill color. Current fill pattern and fill color is used to fill the area. setfillstyle sets the current fill pattern and fill color. To set a user-defined fill pattern, do not give a pattern of 12 (USER_FILL) to setfillstyle; instead, call setfillpattern.
Syntax for setfillstyle() Function in C
#include<graphics.h> void setfillstyle(int pattern, int color);
color
Specify the color • BLACK – 0 • BLUE – 1 • GREEN – 2 • CYAN – 3 • RED – 4 • MAGENTA – 5 • BROWN – 6 • LIGHTGRAY – 7 • DARKGRAY – 8 • LIGHTBLUE – 9 • LIGHTGREEN – 10 • LIGHTCYAN – 11 • LIGHTRED – 12 • LIGHTMAGENTA – 13 • YELLOW – 14 • WHITE – 15
pattern
Specify the pattern • EMPTY_FILL – 0 • SOLID_FILL – 1 • LINE_FILL – 2 • LTSLASH_FILL – 3 • SLASH_FILL – 4 • BKSLASH_FILL – 5 • LTBKSLASH_FILL – 6 • HATCH_FILL – 7 • XHATCH_FILL – 8 • INTERLEAVE_FILL – 9 • WIDE_DOT_FILL – 10 • CLOSE_DOT_FILL – 11 • USER_FILL – 12 If invalid input is passed to setfillstyle, graphresult returns -1(grError), and the current fill pattern and fill color remain unchanged. Note: The EMPTY_FILL style is like a solid fill using the current background color (which is set by setbkcolor).
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/* set the current fill pattern and fill color by setfillstyle() function example */ #include<stdio.h> #include<conio.h> #include<graphics.h> void main() { int gd=DETECT, gm,bkcolor; initgraph(&gd,&gm," "); setfillstyle(EMPTY_FILL,YELLOW); bar3d(2,150,100,200,25,1); setfillstyle(SOLID_FILL,RED); bar3d(150,150,250,200,25,1); setfillstyle(LINE_FILL,BLUE); bar3d(300,150,400,200,25,1); setfillstyle(LTSLASH_FILL,GREEN); bar3d(450,150,550,200,25,1); setfillstyle(SLASH_FILL,CYAN); bar3d(2,250,100,300,25,1); setfillstyle(BKSLASH_FILL,BROWN); bar3d(150,250,250,300,25,1); setfillstyle(LTBKSLASH_FILL,MAGENTA); bar3d(300,250,400,300,25,1); setfillstyle(HATCH_FILL,LIGHTRED); bar3d(450,250,550,300,25,1); setfillstyle(XHATCH_FILL,DARKGRAY); bar3d(2,350,100,400,25,1); setfillstyle(INTERLEAVE_FILL,YELLOW); bar3d(150,350,250,400,25,1); setfillstyle(WIDE_DOT_FILL,LIGHTMAGENTA); bar3d(300,350,400,400,25,1); setfillstyle(CLOSE_DOT_FILL,LIGHTGRAY); bar3d(450,350,550,400,25,1); getch(); closegraph(); }
#include Directive in C
#include is a way of including a standard or user-defined file in the program and is mostly written at the beginning of any C/C++ program. This directive is read by the preprocessor and orders it to insert the content of a user-defined or system header file into the following program. These files are mainly imported from an outside source into the current program. The process of importing such files that might be system-defined or user-defined is known as File Inclusion. This type of preprocessor directive tells the compiler to include a file in the source code program. Here are the two types of file that can be included using #include: • Header File or Standard files: This is a file which contains C/C++ function declarations and macro definitions to be shared between several source files. Functions like the printf(), scanf(), cout, cin and various other input-output or other standard functions are contained within different header files. So to utilise those functions, the users need to import a few header files which define the required functions. • User-defined files: These files resembles the header files, except for the fact that they are written and defined by the user itself. This saves the user from writing a particular function multiple times. Once a user-defined file is written, it can be imported anywhere in the program using the #include preprocessor.
Syntax for #include Directive in C
#include "user-defined_file"
Including using " ": When using the double quotes(" "), the preprocessor access the current directory in which the source "header_file" is located. This type is mainly used to access any header files of the user's program or user-defined files.
#include <header_file>
Including using <>: While importing file using angular brackets(<>), the the preprocessor uses a predetermined directory path to access the file. It is mainly used to access system header files located in the standard system directories.
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/* #include directive tells the preprocessor to insert the contents of another file into the source code at the point where the #include directive is found. */ // C program to illustrate file inclusion // <> used to import system header file #include <stdio.h> // " " used to import user-defined file #include "process.h" // main function int main() { // add function defined in process.h add(10, 20); // mult function defined in process.h multiply(10, 20); // printf defined in stdio.h printf("Process completed"); return 0; }
line() Function in C
line() is a library function of graphics.c in c programming language which is used to draw a line from two coordinates. line() function is used to draw a line from a point(x1,y1) to point(x2,y2) i.e. (x1,y1) and (x2,y2) are end points of the line.
Syntax for line() Function in C
#include <graphics.h> void line(int x1, int y1, int x2, int y2);
x1
X coordinate of first point
y1
Y coordinate of first point.
x2
X coordinate of second point.
y2
Y coordinate of second point. This is a predefined function named line which is used to draw a line on the output screen. It takes 4 arguments, first two parameters represent an initial point and the last two arguments are for the final points of the line.
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/* draw a line from a point(x1,y1) to point(x2,y2) by line() function example */ /*C graphics program to draw a line.*/ #include <graphics.h> #include <conio.h> main() { int gd = DETECT, gm; //init graphics initgraph(&gd, &gm, "C:/TURBOC3/BGI"); /* if you are using turboc2 use below line to init graphics: initgraph(&gd, &gm, "C:/TC/BGI"); */ //draw a line /* line() function description parameter left to right x1: 100 y1: 100 x2: 200 y2: 100 */ line(100,100,200,100); //will draw a horizontal line line(10,10,200,10); //will draw another horizonatl line getch(); closegraph(); return 0; }
main() Function in C
In C, the "main" function is treated the same as every function, it has a return type (and in some cases accepts inputs via parameters). The only difference is that the main function is "called" by the operating system when the user runs the program. Thus the main function is always the first code executed when a program starts. main() function is a user defined, body of the function is defined by the programmer or we can say main() is programmer/user implemented function, whose prototype is predefined in the compiler. Hence we can say that main() in c programming is user defined as well as predefined because it's prototype is predefined. main() is a system (compiler) declared function whose defined by the user, which is invoked automatically by the operating system when program is being executed. Its first function or entry point of the program from where program start executed, program's execution starts from the main. So main is an important function in c , c++ programming language.
Syntax for main() Function in C
void main() { ......... // codes start from here ......... }
void
is a keyword in C language, void means nothing, whenever we use void as a function return type then that function nothing return. here main() function no return any value. In place of void we can also use int return type of main() function, at that time main() return integer type value.
main
is a name of function which is predefined function in C library. • An operating system always calls the main() function when a programmers or users execute their programming code. • It is responsible for starting and ends of the program. • It is a universally accepted keyword in programming language and cannot change its meaning and name. • A main() function is a user-defined function in C that means we can pass parameters to the main() function according to the requirement of a program. • A main() function is used to invoke the programming code at the run time, not at the compile time of a program. • A main() function is followed by opening and closing parenthesis brackets.
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/* basic c program by main() function example */ #include <stdio.h> #include <conio.h> main() { printf (" It is a main() function "); int fun2(); // jump to void fun1() function printf ("\n Finally exit from the main() function. "); } void fun1() { printf (" It is a second function. "); printf (" Exit from the void fun1() function. "); } int fun2() { void fun1(); // jump to the int fun1() function printf (" It is a third function. "); printf (" Exit from the int fun2() function. "); return 0; }
rectangle() Function in C
rectangle() is used to draw a rectangle. Coordinates of left top and right bottom corner are required to draw the rectangle. left specifies the X-coordinate of top left corner, top specifies the Y-coordinate of top left corner, right specifies the X-coordinate of right bottom corner, bottom specifies the Y-coordinate of right bottom corner.
Syntax for rectangle() Function in C
#include<graphics.h> rectangle(int left, int top, int right, int bottom);
left
X coordinate of top left corner.
top
Y coordinate of top left corner.
right
X coordinate of bottom right corner.
bottom
Y coordinate of bottom right corner.
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/* draw a rectangle by rectangle() function example */ // C program to draw a rectangle #include <graphics.h> // Driver code int main() { // gm is Graphics mode which is a computer display // mode that generates image using pixels. // DETECT is a macro defined in "graphics.h" header file int gd = DETECT, gm; // location of left, top, right, bottom int left = 150, top = 150; int right = 450, bottom = 450; // initgraph initializes the graphics system // by loading a graphics driver from disk initgraph(&gd, &gm, ""); // rectangle function rectangle(left, top, right, bottom); getch(); // closegraph function closes the graphics // mode and deallocates all memory allocated // by graphics system . closegraph(); return 0; }
restorecrtmode() Function in C
restorecrtmode restores the original video mode detected by initgraph. This function can be used in conjunction with setgraphmode to switch back and forth between text and graphics modes. Textmode should not be used for this purpose; use it only when the screen is in text mode, to change to a different text mode.
Syntax for restorecrtmode() Function in C
#include <graphics.h> void restorecrtmode(void);
restorecrtmode() restores the original screen mode that existed prior to calling initgraph(). Most often, this represents the text mode. restorecrtmode() and setgraphmode() can be alternately called to switch between text and graphics mode. Function returns nothing.
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/* restore the original video mode detected by initgraph by restorecrtmode() function example. */ #include <graphics.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <conio.h> int main(void) { /* request auto detection */ int gd = DETECT, gmode, err; int midx, midy; /* initialize graphics and local variables */ initgraph(&gd, &gmode, "C:/TURBOC3/BGI"); /* read result of initialization */ err = graphresult(); if (err != grOk) { /* an error occurred */ printf("Graphics error: %s\n", grapherrormsg(err)); getch(); return 0; } /* mid position in x and y-axis */ midx = getmaxx() / 2; midy = getmaxy() / 2; /* output a message */ settextjustify(CENTER_TEXT, CENTER_TEXT); outtextxy(midx, midy - 100, "GRAPHICS MODE"); /* draw a rectange at the given position */ rectangle(midx - 50, midy - 50, midx + 50, midy + 50); getch(); /* restore system to text mode */ restorecrtmode(); printf("Restored system to text mode"); getch(); /* return to graphics mode */ setgraphmode(getgraphmode()); /* output a message */ settextjustify(CENTER_TEXT, CENTER_TEXT); outtextxy(midx, midy - 100, "BACK TO GRAPHIC MODE!!"); /* draws a rectangle at the given postion */ rectangle(midx - 50, midy - 50, midx + 50, midy + 50); /* clean up */ getch(); closegraph(); return 0; }
gotoxy() Function in C
The gotoxy() function places the cursor at the desired location on the screen. This means it is possible to change the cursor location on the screen using the gotoxy() function. It is basically used to print text wherever the cursor is moved.
Syntax for gotoxy() Function in C
#include <stdio.h> void gotoxy(int x, int y);
x
x-coordinate of the point
y
y-coordinate of the point where (x, y) is the position where we want to place the cursor. If you want to take your cursor on a particular coordinate on the window, then this function is made for you. What it takes from you are two parameters. The Integers should be the x and y coordinate of the console. This is pretty helpful for games and animations. The Integers should be passed when you call the function in your program.
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/* place cursor at a desired location on screen by gotoxy() function example */ #include <stdio.h> //to use 'gotoxy()' and 'getch()' #include <conio.h> int main() { // define the type of variables int a, b; // define the value of variables a = 50; b = 30; // change cursor position on further co-ordinates. gotoxy(a, b); // message printf("The position of cursor is changed"); // for killing the execution getch(); return 0; }


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