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C Programming Code Examples

C > Beginners Lab Assignments Code Examples

Program to count the number of words in an input text file

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/* Program to count the number of words in an input text file */ #define NULL 0 FILE *fpt; void main() { char name[20],c; int nw=0; clrscr(); printf("Enter the name of file to be checked:- "); gets(name); fpt=fopen(name,"r"); if (fpt==NULL) { printf(" ERROR - can/'t open file %s",name); getch(); exit(0); } else { while ((c=getc(fpt))!=EOF) { switch(1) { case 1: if (c==' ') { point: // do // nw=nw+1-1; while((c=getc(fpt))==' '); if (c!=' ') nw=nw+1; if(c==' ')nw--; } // case 3: if(c==' '){ goto point;} } } } printf(" The no. of words in %s is %d. ",name,nw); getch(); }
clrscr() Function in C
Function clrscr() clears the screen and moves the cursor to the upper left-hand corner of the screen. If you are using the GCC compiler, use system function to execute the clear/cls command. clrscr() function is also a non-standard function defined in "conio.h" header. This function is used to clear the console screen. It is often used at the beginning of the program (mostly after variable declaration but not necessarily) so that the console is clear for our output.
Syntax to Clear the Console in C
#include<conio.h> clrscr(); OR system("cls"); OR system("clear");
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/* clear the screen and moves the cursor to the upper left-hand corner of the screen by clrscr() function example. */ #include <stdio.h> // clrscr() function definition void clrscr(void) { system("clear"); } int main() { clrscr(); //clear output screen printf("Hello World!!!"); //print message return 0; }
printf() Function in C
Writes the C string pointed by format to the standard output (stdout). If format includes format specifiers (subsequences beginning with %), the additional arguments following format are formatted and inserted in the resulting string replacing their respective specifiers. printf format string refers to a control parameter used by a class of functions in the input/output libraries of C programming language. The string is written in a simple template language: characters are usually copied literally into the function's output, but format specifiers, which start with a % character, indicate the location and method to translate a piece of data (such as a number) to characters. "printf" is the name of one of the main C output functions, and stands for "print formatted". printf format strings are complementary to scanf format strings, which provide formatted input (parsing). In both cases these provide simple functionality and fixed format compared to more sophisticated and flexible template engines or parsers, but are sufficient for many purposes.
Syntax for printf() function in C
#include <stdio.h> int printf ( const char * format, ... );
format
C string that contains the text to be written to stdout. It can optionally contain embedded format specifiers that are replaced by the values specified in subsequent additional arguments and formatted as requested. A format specifier follows this prototype: [see compatibility note below] %[flags][width][.precision][length]specifier Where the specifier character at the end is the most significant component, since it defines the type and the interpretation of its corresponding argument:
specifier
a conversion format specifier.
d or i
Signed decimal integer
u
Unsigned decimal integer
o
Unsigned octal
x
Unsigned hexadecimal integer
X
Unsigned hexadecimal integer (uppercase)
f
Decimal floating point, lowercase
F
Decimal floating point, uppercase
e
Scientific notation (mantissa/exponent), lowercase
E
Scientific notation (mantissa/exponent), uppercase
g
Use the shortest representation: %e or %f
G
Use the shortest representation: %E or %F
a
Hexadecimal floating point, lowercase
A
Hexadecimal floating point, uppercase
c
Character
s
String of characters
p
Pointer address
n
Nothing printed. The corresponding argument must be a pointer to a signed int. The number of characters written so far is stored in the pointed location.
%
A % followed by another % character will write a single % to the stream. The format specifier can also contain sub-specifiers: flags, width, .precision and modifiers (in that order), which are optional and follow these specifications:
flags
one or more flags that modifies the conversion behavior (optional)
-
Left-justify within the given field width; Right justification is the default (see width sub-specifier).
+
Forces to preceed the result with a plus or minus sign (+ or -) even for positive numbers. By default, only negative numbers are preceded with a - sign.
(space)
If no sign is going to be written, a blank space is inserted before the value.
#
Used with o, x or X specifiers the value is preceeded with 0, 0x or 0X respectively for values different than zero. Used with a, A, e, E, f, F, g or G it forces the written output to contain a decimal point even if no more digits follow. By default, if no digits follow, no decimal point is written.
0
Left-pads the number with zeroes (0) instead of spaces when padding is specified (see width sub-specifier).
width
an optional * or integer value used to specify minimum width field.
(number)
Minimum number of characters to be printed. If the value to be printed is shorter than this number, the result is padded with blank spaces. The value is not truncated even if the result is larger.
*
The width is not specified in the format string, but as an additional integer value argument preceding the argument that has to be formatted.
.precision
an optional field consisting of a . followed by * or integer or nothing to specify the precision.
.number
For integer specifiers (d, i, o, u, x, X): precision specifies the minimum number of digits to be written. If the value to be written is shorter than this number, the result is padded with leading zeros. The value is not truncated even if the result is longer. A precision of 0 means that no character is written for the value 0. For a, A, e, E, f and F specifiers: this is the number of digits to be printed after the decimal point (by default, this is 6). For g and G specifiers: This is the maximum number of significant digits to be printed. For s: this is the maximum number of characters to be printed. By default all characters are printed until the ending null character is encountered. If the period is specified without an explicit value for precision, 0 is assumed.
.*
The precision is not specified in the format string, but as an additional integer value argument preceding the argument that has to be formatted.
length
an optional length modifier that specifies the size of the argument.
... (additional arguments)
Depending on the format string, the function may expect a sequence of additional arguments, each containing a value to be used to replace a format specifier in the format string (or a pointer to a storage location, for n). There should be at least as many of these arguments as the number of values specified in the format specifiers. Additional arguments are ignored by the function. If a writing error occurs, the error indicator (ferror) is set and a negative number is returned. If a multibyte character encoding error occurs while writing wide characters, errno is set to EILSEQ and a negative number is returned.
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/* print formatted data to stdout by printf() function example */ #include <stdio.h> int main() { char ch; char str[100]; int a; float b; printf("Enter any character \n"); scanf("%c", &ch); printf("Entered character is %c \n", ch); printf("Enter any string ( upto 100 character ) \n"); scanf("%s", &str); printf("Entered string is %s \n", str); printf("Enter integer and then a float: "); // Taking multiple inputs scanf("%d%f", &a, &b); printf("You entered %d and %f", a, b); return 0; }
Goto Statement in C
A goto statement in C programming language provides an unconditional jump from the 'goto' to a labeled statement in the same function. The goto statement is known as jump statement in C. As the name suggests, goto is used to transfer the program control to a predefined label. The goto statment can be used to repeat some part of the code for a particular condition. It can also be used to break the multiple loops which can't be done by using a single break statement.
Syntax for Goto Statement in C
label: //some part of the code; goto label;
Use of goto statement is highly discouraged in any programming language because it makes difficult to trace the control flow of a program, making the program hard to understand and hard to modify. Any program that uses a goto can be rewritten to avoid them.
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/* transfer control of the program to the specified label by goto statement example */ // Program to calculate the sum and average of positive numbers // If the user enters a negative number, the sum and average are displayed. #include <stdio.h> int main() { const int maxInput = 100; int i; double number, average, sum = 0.0; for (i = 1; i <= maxInput; ++i) { printf("%d. Enter a number: ", i); scanf("%lf", &number); // go to jump if the user enters a negative number if (number < 0.0) { goto jump; } sum += number; } jump: average = sum / (i - 1); printf("Sum = %.2f\n", sum); printf("Average = %.2f", average); return 0; }
scanf() Function in C
Read formatted data from stdin. Reads data from stdin and stores them according to the parameter format into the locations pointed by the additional arguments. The additional arguments should point to already allocated objects of the type specified by their corresponding format specifier within the format string. In C programming, scanf() is one of the commonly used function to take input from the user. The scanf() function reads formatted input from the standard input such as keyboards. The scanf() function enables the programmer to accept formatted inputs to the application or production code. Moreover, by using this function, the users can provide dynamic input values to the application.
Syntax for scanf() Function in C
#include <stdio.h> int scanf ( const char * format, ... );
format
C string that contains a sequence of characters that control how characters extracted from the stream are treated: • Whitespace character: the function will read and ignore any whitespace characters encountered before the next non-whitespace character (whitespace characters include spaces, newline and tab characters -- see isspace). A single whitespace in the format string validates any quantity of whitespace characters extracted from the stream (including none). • Non-whitespace character, except format specifier (%): Any character that is not either a whitespace character (blank, newline or tab) or part of a format specifier (which begin with a % character) causes the function to read the next character from the stream, compare it to this non-whitespace character and if it matches, it is discarded and the function continues with the next character of format. If the character does not match, the function fails, returning and leaving subsequent characters of the stream unread. • Format specifiers: A sequence formed by an initial percentage sign (%) indicates a format specifier, which is used to specify the type and format of the data to be retrieved from the stream and stored into the locations pointed by the additional arguments. A format specifier for scanf follows this prototype: %[*][width][length]specifier
specifier
Where the specifier character at the end is the most significant component, since it defines which characters are extracted, their interpretation and the type of its corresponding argument:
i – integer
Any number of digits, optionally preceded by a sign (+ or -). Decimal digits assumed by default (0-9), but a 0 prefix introduces octal digits (0-7), and 0x hexadecimal digits (0-f). Signed argument.
d or u – decimal integer
Any number of decimal digits (0-9), optionally preceded by a sign (+ or -). d is for a signed argument, and u for an unsigned.
o – octal integer
Any number of octal digits (0-7), optionally preceded by a sign (+ or -). Unsigned argument.
x – hexadecimal integer
Any number of hexadecimal digits (0-9, a-f, A-F), optionally preceded by 0x or 0X, and all optionally preceded by a sign (+ or -). Unsigned argument.
f, e, g – floating point number
A series of decimal digits, optionally containing a decimal point, optionally preceeded by a sign (+ or -) and optionally followed by the e or E character and a decimal integer (or some of the other sequences supported by strtod). Implementations complying with C99 also support hexadecimal floating-point format when preceded by 0x or 0X.
c – character
The next character. If a width other than 1 is specified, the function reads exactly width characters and stores them in the successive locations of the array passed as argument. No null character is appended at the end.
s – string of characters
Any number of non-whitespace characters, stopping at the first whitespace character found. A terminating null character is automatically added at the end of the stored sequence.
p – pointer address
A sequence of characters representing a pointer. The particular format used depends on the system and library implementation, but it is the same as the one used to format %p in fprintf.
[characters] – scanset
Any number of the characters specified between the brackets. A dash (-) that is not the first character may produce non-portable behavior in some library implementations.
[^characters] – negated scanset
Any number of characters none of them specified as characters between the brackets.
n – count
No input is consumed. The number of characters read so far from stdin is stored in the pointed location.
%
A % followed by another % matches a single %. Except for n, at least one character shall be consumed by any specifier. Otherwise the match fails, and the scan ends there.
sub-specifier
The format specifier can also contain sub-specifiers: asterisk (*), width and length (in that order), which are optional and follow these specifications:
*
An optional starting asterisk indicates that the data is to be read from the stream but ignored (i.e. it is not stored in the location pointed by an argument).
width
Specifies the maximum number of characters to be read in the current reading operation (optional).
length
One of hh, h, l, ll, j, z, t, L (optional). This alters the expected type of the storage pointed by the corresponding argument (see below).
... (additional arguments)
Depending on the format string, the function may expect a sequence of additional arguments, each containing a pointer to allocated storage where the interpretation of the extracted characters is stored with the appropriate type. There should be at least as many of these arguments as the number of values stored by the format specifiers. Additional arguments are ignored by the function. These arguments are expected to be pointers: to store the result of a scanf operation on a regular variable, its name should be preceded by the reference operator (&) (see example). On success, the function returns the number of items of the argument list successfully filled. This count can match the expected number of items or be less (even zero) due to a matching failure, a reading error, or the reach of the end-of-file. If a reading error happens or the end-of-file is reached while reading, the proper indicator is set (feof or ferror). And, if either happens before any data could be successfully read, EOF is returned. If an encoding error happens interpreting wide characters, the function sets errno to EILSEQ.
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/* read formatted data from stdin by scanf() function example */ #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) { /* Define temporary variables */ char name[10]; int age; int result; /* Ask the user to enter their first name and age */ printf("Please enter your first name and your age.\n"); /* Read a name and age from the user */ result = scanf("%s %d",name, &age); /* We were not able to parse the two required values */ if (result < 2) { /* Display an error and exit */ printf("Either name or age was not entered\n\n"); exit(0); } /* Display the values the user entered */ printf("Name: %s\n", name); printf("Age: %d\n", age); return 0; }
getch() Function in C
The getch() is a predefined non-standard function that is defined in conio.h header file. It is mostly used by the Dev C/C++, MS- DOS's compilers like Turbo C to hold the screen until the user passes a single value to exit from the console screen. It can also be used to read a single byte character or string from the keyboard and then print. It does not hold any parameters. It has no buffer area to store the input character in a program.
Syntax for getch() Function in C
#include <conio.h> int getch(void);
The getch() function does not accept any parameter from the user. It returns the ASCII value of the key pressed by the user as an input. We use a getch() function in a C/ C++ program to hold the output screen for some time until the user passes a key from the keyboard to exit the console screen. Using getch() function, we can hide the input character provided by the users in the ATM PIN, password, etc. • getch() method pauses the Output Console until a key is pressed. • It does not use any buffer to store the input character. • The entered character is immediately returned without waiting for the enter key. • The entered character does not show up on the console. • The getch() method can be used to accept hidden inputs like password, ATM pin numbers, etc.
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/* wait for any character input from keyboard by getch() function example. */ // C code to illustrate working of // getch() to accept hidden inputs #include <conio.h> #include <dos.h> // delay() #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> void main() { // Taking the password of 8 characters char pwd[9]; int i; // To clear the screen clrscr(); printf("Enter Password: "); for (i = 0; i < 8; i++) { // Get the hidden input // using getch() method pwd[i] = getch(); // Print * to show that // a character is entered printf("*"); } pwd[i] = '\0'; printf("\n"); // Now the hidden input is stored in pwd[] // So any operation can be done on it // Here we are just printing printf("Entered password: "); for (i = 0; pwd[i] != '\0'; i++) printf("%c", pwd[i]); // Now the console will wait // for a key to be pressed getch(); }
fopen() Function in C
Open file. Opens the file whose name is specified in the parameter filename and associates it with a stream that can be identified in future operations by the FILE pointer returned. The operations that are allowed on the stream and how these are performed are defined by the mode parameter. The returned stream is fully buffered by default if it is known to not refer to an interactive device (see setbuf). The returned pointer can be disassociated from the file by calling fclose or freopen. All opened files are automatically closed on normal program termination. The running environment supports at least FOPEN_MAX files open simultaneously.
Syntax for fopen() Function in C
#include <stdio.h> FILE * fopen ( const char * filename, const char * mode );
filename
C string containing the name of the file to be opened. Its value shall follow the file name specifications of the running environment and can include a path (if supported by the system).
mode
C string containing a file access mode. It can be:
r read
Open file for input operations. The file must exist.
w write
Create an empty file for output operations. If a file with the same name already exists, its contents are discarded and the file is treated as a new empty file.
a append
Open file for output at the end of a file. Output operations always write data at the end of the file, expanding it. Repositioning operations (fseek, fsetpos, rewind) are ignored. The file is created if it does not exist.
r+ read/update
Open a file for update (both for input and output). The file must exist.
w+ write/update
Create an empty file and open it for update (both for input and output). If a file with the same name already exists its contents are discarded and the file is treated as a new empty file.
a+ append/update
Open a file for update (both for input and output) with all output operations writing data at the end of the file. Repositioning operations (fseek, fsetpos, rewind) affects the next input operations, but output operations move the position back to the end of file. The file is created if it does not exist. With the mode specifiers above the file is open as a text file. In order to open a file as a binary file, a "b" character has to be included in the mode string. This additional "b" character can either be appended at the end of the string (thus making the following compound modes: "rb", "wb", "ab", "r+b", "w+b", "a+b") or be inserted between the letter and the "+" sign for the mixed modes ("rb+", "wb+", "ab+"). The new C standard (C2011, which is not part of C++) adds a new standard subspecifier ("x"), that can be appended to any "w" specifier (to form "wx", "wbx", "w+x" or "w+bx"/"wb+x"). This subspecifier forces the function to fail if the file exists, instead of overwriting it. If additional characters follow the sequence, the behavior depends on the library implementation: some implementations may ignore additional characters so that for example an additional "t" (sometimes used to explicitly state a text file) is accepted. On some library implementations, opening or creating a text file with update mode may treat the stream instead as a binary file. Text files are files containing sequences of lines of text. Depending on the environment where the application runs, some special character conversion may occur in input/output operations in text mode to adapt them to a system-specific text file format. Although on some environments no conversions occur and both text files and binary files are treated the same way, using the appropriate mode improves portability. For files open for update (those which include a "+" sign), on which both input and output operations are allowed, the stream shall be flushed (fflush) or repositioned (fseek, fsetpos, rewind) before a reading operation that follows a writing operation. The stream shall be repositioned (fseek, fsetpos, rewind) before a writing operation that follows a reading operation (whenever that operation did not reach the end-of-file). If the file is successfully opened, the function returns a pointer to a FILE object that can be used to identify the stream on future operations. Otherwise, a null pointer is returned. On most library implementations, the errno variable is also set to a system-specific error code on failure.
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/* open the file specified by filename and associates a stream with it by fopen() function example */ /* Open, write and close a file : */ # include <stdio.h> # include <string.h> int main( ) { FILE *fp ; char data[50]; // opening an existing file printf( "Opening the file test.c in write mode" ) ; fp = fopen("test.c", "w") ; if ( fp == NULL ) { printf( "Could not open file test.c" ) ; return 1; } printf( "\n Enter some text from keyboard" \ " to write in the file test.c" ) ; // getting input from user while ( strlen ( gets( data ) ) > 0 ) { // writing in the file fputs(data, fp) ; fputs("\n", fp) ; } // closing the file printf("Closing the file test.c") ; fclose(fp) ; return 0; }
exit() Function in C
The exit() function is used to terminate a process or function calling immediately in the program. It means any open file or function belonging to the process is closed immediately as the exit() function occurred in the program. The exit() function is the standard library function of the C, which is defined in the stdlib.h header file. So, we can say it is the function that forcefully terminates the current program and transfers the control to the operating system to exit the program. The exit(0) function determines the program terminates without any error message, and then the exit(1) function determines the program forcefully terminates the execution process.
Syntax for exit() Function in C
#include <stdlib.h> void exit(int status)
status
Status code. If this is 0 or EXIT_SUCCESS, it indicates success. If it is EXIT_FAILURE, it indicates failure. The exit function does not return anything. • We must include the stdlib.h header file while using the exit () function. • It is used to terminate the normal execution of the program while encountered the exit () function. • The exit () function calls the registered atexit() function in the reverse order of their registration. • We can use the exit() function to flush or clean all open stream data like read or write with unwritten buffered data. • It closed all opened files linked with a parent or another function or file and can remove all files created by the tmpfile function. • The program's behaviour is undefined if the user calls the exit function more than one time or calls the exit and quick_exit function. • The exit function is categorized into two parts: exit(0) and exit(1).
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/* call all functions registered with atexit and terminates the program by exit() function example */ #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> int main () { // declaration of the variables int i, num; printf ( " Enter the last number: "); scanf ( " %d", &num); for ( i = 1; i<num; i++) { // use if statement to check the condition if ( i == 6 ) /* use exit () statement with passing 0 argument to show termination of the program without any error message. */ exit(0); else printf (" \n Number is %d", i); } return 0; }
If Else Statement in C
The if-else statement is used to perform two operations for a single condition. The if-else statement is an extension to the if statement using which, we can perform two different operations, i.e., one is for the correctness of that condition, and the other is for the incorrectness of the condition. Here, we must notice that if and else block cannot be executed simiulteneously. Using if-else statement is always preferable since it always invokes an otherwise case with every if condition.
Syntax for if-else Statement in C
if (test expression) { // run code if test expression is true } else { // run code if test expression is false }
If the test expression is evaluated to true, • statements inside the body of if are executed. • statements inside the body of else are skipped from execution. If the test expression is evaluated to false, • statements inside the body of else are executed • statements inside the body of if are skipped from execution.
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/* if else statement in C language */ // Check whether an integer is odd or even #include <stdio.h> int main() { int number; printf("Enter an integer: "); scanf("%d", &number); // True if the remainder is 0 if (number%2 == 0) { printf("%d is an even integer.",number); } else { printf("%d is an odd integer.",number); } return 0; }
open() Function in C
The open() function shall establish the connection between a file and a file descriptor. It shall create an open file description that refers to a file and a file descriptor that refers to that open file description. The file descriptor is used by other I/O functions to refer to that file. The path argument points to a pathname naming the file. The open() function shall return a file descriptor for the named file that is the lowest file descriptor not currently open for that process. The open file description is new, and therefore the file descriptor shall not share it with any other process in the system. The FD_CLOEXEC file descriptor flag associated with the new file descriptor shall be cleared.
Syntax for open() Function in C
#include <fcntl.h> int open(const char *path, int oflag, ... );
path
path to file which you want to use
oflag
How you like to use The file offset used to mark the current position within the file shall be set to the beginning of the file. The file status flags and file access modes of the open file description shall be set according to the value of oflag. Values for oflag are constructed by a bitwise-inclusive OR of flags from the following list, defined in <fcntl.h>. Applications shall specify exactly one of the first three values (file access modes) below in the value of oflag:
O_RDONLY
Open for reading only.
O_WRONLY
Open for writing only.
O_RDWR
Open for reading and writing. The result is undefined if this flag is applied to a FIFO. Any combination of the following may be used:
O_APPEND
If set, the file offset shall be set to the end of the file prior to each write.
O_CREAT
If the file exists, this flag has no effect except as noted under O_EXCL below. Otherwise, the file shall be created; the user ID of the file shall be set to the effective user ID of the process; the group ID of the file shall be set to the group ID of the file's parent directory or to the effective group ID of the process; and the access permission bits (see <sys/stat.h>) of the file mode shall be set to the value of the third argument taken as type mode_t modified as follows: a bitwise AND is performed on the file-mode bits and the corresponding bits in the complement of the process' file mode creation mask. Thus, all bits in the file mode whose corresponding bit in the file mode creation mask is set are cleared. When bits other than the file permission bits are set, the effect is unspecified. The third argument does not affect whether the file is open for reading, writing, or for both. Implementations shall provide a way to initialize the file's group ID to the group ID of the parent directory. Implementations may, but need not, provide an implementation-defined way to initialize the file's group ID to the effective group ID of the calling process.
O_DSYNC
Write I/O operations on the file descriptor shall complete as defined by synchronized I/O data integrity completion.
O_EXCL
If O_CREAT and O_EXCL are set, open() shall fail if the file exists. The check for the existence of the file and the creation of the file if it does not exist shall be atomic with respect to other threads executing open() naming the same filename in the same directory with O_EXCL and O_CREAT set. If O_EXCL and O_CREAT are set, and path names a symbolic link, open() shall fail and set errno to [EEXIST], regardless of the contents of the symbolic link. If O_EXCL is set and O_CREAT is not set, the result is undefined.
O_NOCTTY
If set and path identifies a terminal device, open() shall not cause the terminal device to become the controlling terminal for the process.
O_NONBLOCK
When opening a FIFO with O_RDONLY or O_WRONLY set: • If O_NONBLOCK is set, an open() for reading-only shall return without delay. An open() for writing-only shall return an error if no process currently has the file open for reading. • If O_NONBLOCK is clear, an open() for reading-only shall block the calling thread until a thread opens the file for writing. An open() for writing-only shall block the calling thread until a thread opens the file for reading. When opening a block special or character special file that supports non-blocking opens: • If O_NONBLOCK is set, the open() function shall return without blocking for the device to be ready or available. Subsequent behavior of the device is device-specific. • If O_NONBLOCK is clear, the open() function shall block the calling thread until the device is ready or available before returning. Otherwise, the behavior of O_NONBLOCK is unspecified.
O_RSYNC
Read I/O operations on the file descriptor shall complete at the same level of integrity as specified by the O_DSYNC and O_SYNC flags. If both O_DSYNC and O_RSYNC are set in oflag, all I/O operations on the file descriptor shall complete as defined by synchronized I/O data integrity completion. If both O_SYNC and O_RSYNC are set in flags, all I/O operations on the file descriptor shall complete as defined by synchronized I/O file integrity completion.
O_SYNC
Write I/O operations on the file descriptor shall complete as defined by synchronized I/O file integrity completion.
O_TRUNC
If the file exists and is a regular file, and the file is successfully opened O_RDWR or O_WRONLY, its length shall be truncated to 0, and the mode and owner shall be unchanged. It shall have no effect on FIFO special files or terminal device files. Its effect on other file types is implementation-defined. The result of using O_TRUNC with O_RDONLY is undefined. If O_CREAT is set and the file did not previously exist, upon successful completion, open() shall mark for update the st_atime, st_ctime, and st_mtime fields of the file and the st_ctime and st_mtime fields of the parent directory. If O_TRUNC is set and the file did previously exist, upon successful completion, open() shall mark for update the st_ctime and st_mtime fields of the file. If both the O_SYNC and O_DSYNC flags are set, the effect is as if only the O_SYNC flag was set. If path refers to a STREAMS file, oflag may be constructed from O_NONBLOCK OR'ed with either O_RDONLY, O_WRONLY, or O_RDWR. Other flag values are not applicable to STREAMS devices and shall have no effect on them. The value O_NONBLOCK affects the operation of STREAMS drivers and certain functions applied to file descriptors associated with STREAMS files. For STREAMS drivers, the implementation of O_NONBLOCK is device-specific. If path names the master side of a pseudo-terminal device, then it is unspecified whether open() locks the slave side so that it cannot be opened. Conforming applications shall call unlockpt() before opening the slave side. The largest value that can be represented correctly in an object of type off_t shall be established as the offset maximum in the open file description. Upon successful completion, the function shall open the file and return a non-negative integer representing the lowest numbered unused file descriptor. Otherwise, -1 shall be returned and errno set to indicate the error. No files shall be created or modified if the function returns -1. The open() function shall fail if:
EACCES
Search permission is denied on a component of the path prefix, or the file exists and the permissions specified by oflag are denied, or the file does not exist and write permission is denied for the parent directory of the file to be created, or O_TRUNC is specified and write permission is denied.
EEXIST
O_CREAT and O_EXCL are set, and the named file exists.
EINTR
A signal was caught during open().
EINVAL
The implementation does not support synchronized I/O for this file.
EIO
The path argument names a STREAMS file and a hangup or error occurred during the open().
EISDIR
The named file is a directory and oflag includes O_WRONLY or O_RDWR.
ELOOP
A loop exists in symbolic links encountered during resolution of the path argument.
EMFILE
{OPEN_MAX} file descriptors are currently open in the calling process.
ENAMETOOLONG
The length of the path argument exceeds {PATH_MAX} or a pathname component is longer than {NAME_MAX}.
ENFILE
The maximum allowable number of files is currently open in the system.
ENOENT
O_CREAT is not set and the named file does not exist; or O_CREAT is set and either the path prefix does not exist or the path argument points to an empty string.
ENOSR
The path argument names a STREAMS-based file and the system is unable to allocate a STREAM.
ENOSPC
The directory or file system that would contain the new file cannot be expanded, the file does not exist, and O_CREAT is specified.
ENOTDIR
A component of the path prefix is not a directory.
ENXIO
O_NONBLOCK is set, the named file is a FIFO, O_WRONLY is set, and no process has the file open for reading.
ENXIO
The named file is a character special or block special file, and the device associated with this special file does not exist.
EOVERFLOW
The named file is a regular file and the size of the file cannot be represented correctly in an object of type off_t.
EROFS
The named file resides on a read-only file system and either O_WRONLY, O_RDWR, O_CREAT (if the file does not exist), or O_TRUNC is set in the oflag argument. The open() function may fail if:
EAGAIN
The path argument names the slave side of a pseudo-terminal device that is locked.
EINVAL
The value of the oflag argument is not valid.
ELOOP
More than {SYMLOOP_MAX} symbolic links were encountered during resolution of the path argument.
ENAMETOOLONG
As a result of encountering a symbolic link in resolution of the path argument, the length of the substituted pathname string exceeded {PATH_MAX}.
ENOMEM
The path argument names a STREAMS file and the system is unable to allocate resources.
ETXTBSY
The file is a pure procedure (shared text) file that is being executed and oflag is O_WRONLY or O_RDWR.
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/* open or create a file for reading, writing or executing by open() function code example */ // C program to illustrate // open system call #include<stdio.h> #include<fcntl.h> #include<errno.h> extern int errno; int main() { // if file does not have in directory // then file foo.txt is created. int fd = open("foo.txt", O_RDONLY | O_CREAT); printf("fd = %d/n", fd); if (fd ==-1) { // print which type of error have in a code printf("Error Number % d\n", errno); // print program detail "Success or failure" perror("Program"); } return 0; }
Switch Case Statement in C
Switch statement in C tests the value of a variable and compares it with multiple cases. Once the case match is found, a block of statements associated with that particular case is executed. Each case in a block of a switch has a different name/number which is referred to as an identifier. The value provided by the user is compared with all the cases inside the switch block until the match is found. If a case match is NOT found, then the default statement is executed, and the control goes out of the switch block.
Syntax for Switch Case Statement in C
switch(expression) { case constant-expression : statement(s); break; /* optional */ case constant-expression : statement(s); break; /* optional */ /* you can have any number of case statements */ default : /* Optional */ statement(s); }
• The expression used in a switch statement must have an integral or enumerated type, or be of a class type in which the class has a single conversion function to an integral or enumerated type. • You can have any number of case statements within a switch. Each case is followed by the value to be compared to and a colon. • The constant-expression for a case must be the same data type as the variable in the switch, and it must be a constant or a literal. • When the variable being switched on is equal to a case, the statements following that case will execute until a break statement is reached. • When a break statement is reached, the switch terminates, and the flow of control jumps to the next line following the switch statement. • Not every case needs to contain a break. If no break appears, the flow of control will fall through to subsequent cases until a break is reached. • A switch statement can have an optional default case, which must appear at the end of the switch. The default case can be used for performing a task when none of the cases is true. No break is needed in the default case.
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/* switch case statement in C language*/ // Program to create a simple calculator #include <stdio.h> int main() { char operation; double n1, n2; printf("Enter an operator (+, -, *, /): "); scanf("%c", &operation); printf("Enter two operands: "); scanf("%lf %lf",&n1, &n2); switch(operation) { case '+': printf("%.1lf + %.1lf = %.1lf",n1, n2, n1+n2); break; case '-': printf("%.1lf - %.1lf = %.1lf",n1, n2, n1-n2); break; case '*': printf("%.1lf * %.1lf = %.1lf",n1, n2, n1*n2); break; case '/': printf("%.1lf / %.1lf = %.1lf",n1, n2, n1/n2); break; // operator doesn't match any case constant +, -, *, / default: printf("Error! operator is not correct"); } return 0; }
getc() Function in C
Get character from stream. Returns the character currently pointed by the internal file position indicator of the specified stream. The internal file position indicator is then advanced to the next character. If the stream is at the end-of-file when called, the function returns EOF and sets the end-of-file indicator for the stream (feof). If a read error occurs, the function returns EOF and sets the error indicator for the stream (ferror). getc and fgetc are equivalent, except that getc may be implemented as a macro in some libraries. See getchar for a similar function that reads directly from stdin.
Syntax for getc() Function in C
#include <stdio.h> int getc ( FILE * stream );
stream
Pointer to a FILE object that identifies an input stream. Because some libraries may implement this function as a macro, and this may evaluate the stream expression more than once, this should be an expression without side effects. On success, the character read is returned (promoted to an int value). The return type is int to accommodate for the special value EOF, which indicates failure: If the position indicator was at the end-of-file, the function returns EOF and sets the eof indicator (feof) of stream. If some other reading error happens, the function also returns EOF, but sets its error indicator (ferror) instead. The getc function in C reads the next character from any input stream and returns an integer value. It is a standard function in C and can be used by including the <stdio.h> header file. The getc() function can be implemented as a macro whereas fgetc() function can not be used as macro. Also getc() function is highly optimized and hence calls to fgetc() probably take longer than calls to getc(). So, getc() is preferred in most situations.
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/* read a single character from the current stream position and advance the stream position to the next character by getc() function example. */ #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> int main() { //Initialize the file pointer FILE* f; char ch; //Create the file for write operation f = fopen("myfile.txt", "w"); printf("Enter five character\n"); for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) { //take the characters from the users scanf("%c", &ch); //write back to the file putc(ch, f); //clear the stdin stream buffer fflush(stdin); } //close the file after write operation is over fclose(f); //open a file f = fopen("myfile.txt", "r"); printf("Write operation is over and file is ready for read operation\n"); printf("\n...............print the characters..............\n\n"); while (!feof(f)) { //takes the characters in the character array ch = getc(f); //and print the characters printf("%c\n", ch); } fclose(f); return 0; }
Standard Input/Output Devices in C
When we say Input, it means to feed some data into a program. An input can be given in the form of a file or from the command line. C programming provides a set of built-in functions to read the given input and feed it to the program as per requirement. When we say Output, it means to display some data on screen, printer, or in any file. C programming provides a set of built-in functions to output the data on the computer screen as well as to save it in text or binary files. C programming treats all the devices as files. So devices such as the display are addressed in the same way as files and the following three files are automatically opened when a program executes to provide access to the keyboard and screen. • Standard input: stdin(Keyboard). • Standard output: stdout(Screen). • Standard error: stderr(Your screen). The file pointers are the means to access the file for reading and writing purpose. This section explains how to read values from the screen and how to print the result on the screen.
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/* C language provides standard library functions to read any given input and to display data on the console. */ #include<stdlib.h> #include<stdio.h> int main() { char chr; float num1; double num2; int i; printf("Enter a character: "); scanf("%c", &chr); // When %c is used, a character is displayed printf("You entered %c.\n",chr); // When %d is used, ASCII value is displayed printf("ASCII value is %d.", chr); printf("Enter a number: "); scanf("%f", &num1); printf("Enter another number: "); scanf("%lf", &num2); printf("num1 = %f\n", num1); printf("num2 = %lf", num2); printf("Enter a value: "); i = getchar(); printf("You entered: "); putchar(i); return 0; }
main() Function in C
In C, the "main" function is treated the same as every function, it has a return type (and in some cases accepts inputs via parameters). The only difference is that the main function is "called" by the operating system when the user runs the program. Thus the main function is always the first code executed when a program starts. main() function is a user defined, body of the function is defined by the programmer or we can say main() is programmer/user implemented function, whose prototype is predefined in the compiler. Hence we can say that main() in c programming is user defined as well as predefined because it's prototype is predefined. main() is a system (compiler) declared function whose defined by the user, which is invoked automatically by the operating system when program is being executed. Its first function or entry point of the program from where program start executed, program's execution starts from the main. So main is an important function in c , c++ programming language.
Syntax for main() Function in C
void main() { ......... // codes start from here ......... }
void
is a keyword in C language, void means nothing, whenever we use void as a function return type then that function nothing return. here main() function no return any value. In place of void we can also use int return type of main() function, at that time main() return integer type value.
main
is a name of function which is predefined function in C library. • An operating system always calls the main() function when a programmers or users execute their programming code. • It is responsible for starting and ends of the program. • It is a universally accepted keyword in programming language and cannot change its meaning and name. • A main() function is a user-defined function in C that means we can pass parameters to the main() function according to the requirement of a program. • A main() function is used to invoke the programming code at the run time, not at the compile time of a program. • A main() function is followed by opening and closing parenthesis brackets.
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/* basic c program by main() function example */ #include <stdio.h> #include <conio.h> main() { printf (" It is a main() function "); int fun2(); // jump to void fun1() function printf ("\n Finally exit from the main() function. "); } void fun1() { printf (" It is a second function. "); printf (" Exit from the void fun1() function. "); } int fun2() { void fun1(); // jump to the int fun1() function printf (" It is a third function. "); printf (" Exit from the int fun2() function. "); return 0; }
While Loop Statement in C
While loop is also known as a pre-tested loop. In general, a while loop allows a part of the code to be executed multiple times depending upon a given boolean condition. It can be viewed as a repeating if statement. The while loop is mostly used in the case where the number of iterations is not known in advance. The while loop evaluates the test expression inside the parentheses (). If test expression is true, statements inside the body of while loop are executed. Then, test expression is evaluated again. The process goes on until test expression is evaluated to false. If test expression is false, the loop terminates.
Syntax of While Loop Statement in C
while (testExpression) { // the body of the loop }
• The while loop evaluates the testExpression inside the parentheses (). • If testExpression is true, statements inside the body of while loop are executed. Then, testExpression is evaluated again. • The process goes on until testExpression is evaluated to false. • If testExpression is false, the loop terminates (ends).
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/* while loop statement in C language */ #include<stdio.h> int main() { int n, num, sum = 0, remainder; printf("Enter a number: "); scanf("%d", &n); num = n; // keep looping while n > 0 while( n > 0 ) { remainder = n % 10; // get the last digit of n sum += remainder; // add the remainder to the sum n /= 10; // remove the last digit from n } printf("Sum of digits of %d is %d", num, sum); // signal to operating system everything works fine return 0; }
gets() Function in C
Get string from stdin. Reads characters from the standard input (stdin) and stores them as a C string into str until a newline character or the end-of-file is reached. The newline character, if found, is not copied into str. A terminating null character is automatically appended after the characters copied to str. Notice that gets is quite different from fgets: not only gets uses stdin as source, but it does not include the ending newline character in the resulting string and does not allow to specify a maximum size for str (which can lead to buffer overflows). The gets() function enables the user to enter some characters followed by the enter key. All the characters entered by the user get stored in a character array. The null character is added to the array to make it a string. The gets() allows the user to enter the space-separated strings. It returns the string entered by the user.
Syntax for gets() Function in C
#include<stdio.h> char * gets ( char * str );
str
Pointer to a block of memory (array of char) where the string read is copied as a C string. On success, the function returns str. If the end-of-file is encountered while attempting to read a character, the eof indicator is set (feof). If this happens before any characters could be read, the pointer returned is a null pointer (and the contents of str remain unchanged). If a read error occurs, the error indicator (ferror) is set and a null pointer is also returned (but the contents pointed by str may have changed).
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/* read characters from the standard input (stdin) and stores them as a C string */ #include<stdio.h> #include<conio.h> #include<stdlib.h> void main() { clrscr(); FILE *fp; char fname[20]; printf("Enter filename : "); gets(fname); fp=fopen(fname, "r"); if(fp==NULL) { printf("Error in opening the file..!!\n"); printf("Press any key to exit..\n"); getch(); exit(1); } fclose(fp); getch(); }
#define Directive in C
In the C Programming Language, the #define directive allows the definition of macros within your source code. These macro definitions allow constant values to be declared for use throughout your code. Macro definitions are not variables and cannot be changed by your program code like variables. You generally use this syntax when creating constants that represent numbers, strings or expressions.
Syntax for #define Directive in C
#define NAME value /* this syntax creates a constant using define*/ // Or #define NAME (expression) /* this syntax creates a constant using define*/
NAME
is the name of a particular constant. It can either be defined in smaller case or upper case or both. Most of the developers prefer the constant names to be in the upper case to find the differences.
value
defines the value of the constant.
Expression
is the value that is assigned to that constant which is defined. The expression should always be enclosed within the brackets if it has any operators. In the C programming language, the preprocessor directive acts an important role within which the #define directive is present that is used to define the constant or the micro substitution. The #define directive can use any of the basic data types present in the C standard. The #define preprocessor directive lets a programmer or a developer define the macros within the source code. This macro definition will allow the constant value that should be declared for the usage. Macro definitions cannot be changed within the program's code as one does with other variables, as macros are not variables. The #define is usually used in syntax that created a constant that is used to represent numbers, strings, or other expressions. The #define directive should not be enclosed with the semicolon(;). It is a common mistake done, and one should always treat this directive as any other header file. Enclosing it with a semicolon will generate an error. The #define creates a macro, which is in association with an identifier or is parameterized identifier along with a token string. After the macro is defined, then the compiler can substitute the token string for each occurrence of the identifier within the source file.
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/* #define directive allows the definition of macros within your source code. These macro definitions allow constant values to be declared for use throughout your code. */ #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> typedef struct Books { char title[50]; char author[50]; char subject[100]; int book_id; } Book; int main( ) { Book book; strcpy( book.title, "C Programming"); strcpy( book.author, "XCoder"); strcpy( book.subject, "C Programming Tutorial"); book.book_id = 6495407; printf( "Book title : %s\n", book.title); printf( "Book author : %s\n", book.author); printf( "Book subject : %s\n", book.subject); printf( "Book book_id : %d\n", book.book_id); return 0; }


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C program code example outputs the values to the stream. Returns number of characters printed on success or a negative number on failure. The format control string are identical