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C Programming Code Examples

C > Sorting Searching Code Examples

Msort, merge sort [array]

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/* Msort, merge sort [array] */ #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #define MAXARRAY 10 void mergesort(int a[], int low, int high); int main(void) { int array[MAXARRAY]; int i = 0; /* load some random values into the array */ for(i = 0; i < MAXARRAY; i++) array[i] = rand() % 100; /* array before mergesort */ printf("Before :"); for(i = 0; i < MAXARRAY; i++) printf(" %d", array[i]); printf("\n"); mergesort(array, 0, MAXARRAY - 1); /* array after mergesort */ printf("Mergesort :"); for(i = 0; i < MAXARRAY; i++) printf(" %d", array[i]); printf("\n"); return 0; } void mergesort(int a[], int low, int high) { int i = 0; int length = high - low + 1; int pivot = 0; int merge1 = 0; int merge2 = 0; int working[length]; if(low == high) return; pivot = (low + high) / 2; mergesort(a, low, pivot); mergesort(a, pivot + 1, high); for(i = 0; i < length; i++) working[i] = a[low + i]; merge1 = 0; merge2 = pivot - low + 1; for(i = 0; i < length; i++) { if(merge2 <= high - low) if(merge1 <= pivot - low) if(working[merge1] > working[merge2]) a[i + low] = working[merge2++]; else a[i + low] = working[merge1++]; else a[i + low] = working[merge2++]; else a[i + low] = working[merge1++]; } }
printf() Function in C
Writes the C string pointed by format to the standard output (stdout). If format includes format specifiers (subsequences beginning with %), the additional arguments following format are formatted and inserted in the resulting string replacing their respective specifiers. printf format string refers to a control parameter used by a class of functions in the input/output libraries of C programming language. The string is written in a simple template language: characters are usually copied literally into the function's output, but format specifiers, which start with a % character, indicate the location and method to translate a piece of data (such as a number) to characters. "printf" is the name of one of the main C output functions, and stands for "print formatted". printf format strings are complementary to scanf format strings, which provide formatted input (parsing). In both cases these provide simple functionality and fixed format compared to more sophisticated and flexible template engines or parsers, but are sufficient for many purposes.
Syntax for printf() function in C
#include <stdio.h> int printf ( const char * format, ... );
format
C string that contains the text to be written to stdout. It can optionally contain embedded format specifiers that are replaced by the values specified in subsequent additional arguments and formatted as requested. A format specifier follows this prototype: [see compatibility note below] %[flags][width][.precision][length]specifier Where the specifier character at the end is the most significant component, since it defines the type and the interpretation of its corresponding argument:
specifier
a conversion format specifier.
d or i
Signed decimal integer
u
Unsigned decimal integer
o
Unsigned octal
x
Unsigned hexadecimal integer
X
Unsigned hexadecimal integer (uppercase)
f
Decimal floating point, lowercase
F
Decimal floating point, uppercase
e
Scientific notation (mantissa/exponent), lowercase
E
Scientific notation (mantissa/exponent), uppercase
g
Use the shortest representation: %e or %f
G
Use the shortest representation: %E or %F
a
Hexadecimal floating point, lowercase
A
Hexadecimal floating point, uppercase
c
Character
s
String of characters
p
Pointer address
n
Nothing printed. The corresponding argument must be a pointer to a signed int. The number of characters written so far is stored in the pointed location.
%
A % followed by another % character will write a single % to the stream. The format specifier can also contain sub-specifiers: flags, width, .precision and modifiers (in that order), which are optional and follow these specifications:
flags
one or more flags that modifies the conversion behavior (optional)
-
Left-justify within the given field width; Right justification is the default (see width sub-specifier).
+
Forces to preceed the result with a plus or minus sign (+ or -) even for positive numbers. By default, only negative numbers are preceded with a - sign.
(space)
If no sign is going to be written, a blank space is inserted before the value.
#
Used with o, x or X specifiers the value is preceeded with 0, 0x or 0X respectively for values different than zero. Used with a, A, e, E, f, F, g or G it forces the written output to contain a decimal point even if no more digits follow. By default, if no digits follow, no decimal point is written.
0
Left-pads the number with zeroes (0) instead of spaces when padding is specified (see width sub-specifier).
width
an optional * or integer value used to specify minimum width field.
(number)
Minimum number of characters to be printed. If the value to be printed is shorter than this number, the result is padded with blank spaces. The value is not truncated even if the result is larger.
*
The width is not specified in the format string, but as an additional integer value argument preceding the argument that has to be formatted.
.precision
an optional field consisting of a . followed by * or integer or nothing to specify the precision.
.number
For integer specifiers (d, i, o, u, x, X): precision specifies the minimum number of digits to be written. If the value to be written is shorter than this number, the result is padded with leading zeros. The value is not truncated even if the result is longer. A precision of 0 means that no character is written for the value 0. For a, A, e, E, f and F specifiers: this is the number of digits to be printed after the decimal point (by default, this is 6). For g and G specifiers: This is the maximum number of significant digits to be printed. For s: this is the maximum number of characters to be printed. By default all characters are printed until the ending null character is encountered. If the period is specified without an explicit value for precision, 0 is assumed.
.*
The precision is not specified in the format string, but as an additional integer value argument preceding the argument that has to be formatted.
length
an optional length modifier that specifies the size of the argument.
... (additional arguments)
Depending on the format string, the function may expect a sequence of additional arguments, each containing a value to be used to replace a format specifier in the format string (or a pointer to a storage location, for n). There should be at least as many of these arguments as the number of values specified in the format specifiers. Additional arguments are ignored by the function. If a writing error occurs, the error indicator (ferror) is set and a negative number is returned. If a multibyte character encoding error occurs while writing wide characters, errno is set to EILSEQ and a negative number is returned.
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/* print formatted data to stdout by printf() function example */ #include <stdio.h> int main() { char ch; char str[100]; int a; float b; printf("Enter any character \n"); scanf("%c", &ch); printf("Entered character is %c \n", ch); printf("Enter any string ( upto 100 character ) \n"); scanf("%s", &str); printf("Entered string is %s \n", str); printf("Enter integer and then a float: "); // Taking multiple inputs scanf("%d%f", &a, &b); printf("You entered %d and %f", a, b); return 0; }
Relational Operators in C
Relational Operators are the operators used to create a relationship and compare the values of two operands. For example, there are two numbers, 5 and 15, and we can get the greatest number using the greater than operator (>) that returns 15 as the greatest or larger number to the 5. Following are the various types of relational operators in C.
==
Equal To Operator (==) is used to compare both operands and returns 1 if both are equal or the same, and 0 represents the operands that are not equal.
!=
Not Equal To Operator (!=) is the opposite of the Equal To Operator and is represented as the (!=) operator. The Not Equal To Operator compares two operands and returns 1 if both operands are not the same; otherwise, it returns 0.
<
Less than Operator (<) is used to check whether the value of the left operand is less than the right operand, and if the statement is true, the operator is known as the Less than Operator.
>
Greater than Operator (>) checks the value of the left operand is greater than the right operand, and if the statement is true, the operator is said to be the Greater Than Operator.
<=
Less than Equal To Operator (<=) checks whether the value of the left operand is less than or equal to the right operand, and if the statement is true, the operator is said to be the Less than Equal To Operator.
>=
Greater than Equal To Operator (>=) checks whether the left operand's value is greater than or equal to the right operand. If the statement is true, the operator is said to be the Greater than Equal to Operator.
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/* relational operators in C */ #include <stdio.h> main() { int a = 23; int b = 9; int c ; if( a == b ) { printf("Line 1 - a is equal to b\n" ); } else { printf("Line 1 - a is not equal to b\n" ); } if ( a < b ) { printf("Line 2 - a is less than b\n" ); } else { printf("Line 2 - a is not less than b\n" ); } if ( a > b ) { printf("Line 3 - a is greater than b\n" ); } else { printf("Line 3 - a is not greater than b\n" ); } /* Lets change value of a and b */ a = 5; b = 20; if ( a <= b ) { printf("Line 4 - a is either less than or equal to b\n" ); } if ( b >= a ) { printf("Line 5 - b is either greater than or equal to b\n" ); } }
For Loop Statement in C
The for loop is used in the case where we need to execute some part of the code until the given condition is satisfied. The for loop is also called as a per-tested loop. It is better to use for loop if the number of iteration is known in advance. The for-loop statement is a very specialized while loop, which increases the readability of a program. It is frequently used to traverse the data structures like the array and linked list.
Syntax of For Loop Statement in C
for (initialization; condition test; increment or decrement) { //Statements to be executed repeatedly }
Step 1
First initialization happens and the counter variable gets initialized.
Step 2
In the second step the condition is checked, where the counter variable is tested for the given condition, if the condition returns true then the C statements inside the body of for loop gets executed, if the condition returns false then the for loop gets terminated and the control comes out of the loop.
Step 3
After successful execution of statements inside the body of loop, the counter variable is incremented or decremented, depending on the operation (++ or --).
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/* for loop statement in C language */ // Program to calculate the sum of first n natural numbers // Positive integers 1,2,3...n are known as natural numbers #include <stdio.h> int main() { int num, count, sum = 0; printf("Enter a positive integer: "); scanf("%d", &num); // for loop terminates when num is less than count for(count = 1; count <= num; ++count) { sum += count; } printf("Sum = %d", sum); return 0; }
rand() Function in C
Generate random number. Returns a pseudo-random integral number in the range between 0 and RAND_MAX. This number is generated by an algorithm that returns a sequence of apparently non-related numbers each time it is called. This algorithm uses a seed to generate the series, which should be initialized to some distinctive value using function srand. RAND_MAX is a constant defined in <cstdlib>.
Syntax for rand() Function in C
#include<stdlib.h> int rand (void);
In the C programming language, the rand() function is a library function that generates the random number in the range [0, RAND_MAX]. When we use the rand() function in a program, we need to implement the stdlib.h header file because rand() function is defined in the stdlib header file. It does not contain any seed number. Therefore, when we execute the same program again and again, it returns the same values. The C library function int rand(void) returns a pseudo-random number in the range of 0 to RAND_MAX. RAND_MAX is a constant whose default value may vary between implementations but it is granted to be at least 32767. Notice though that this modulo operation does not generate uniformly distributed random numbers in the span (since in most cases this operation makes lower numbers slightly more likely).
Compatibility
In C, the generation algorithm used by rand is guaranteed to only be advanced by calls to this function. In C++, this constraint is relaxed, and a library implementation is allowed to advance the generator on other circumstances (such as calls to elements of ).
Data races
The function accesses and modifies internal state objects, which may cause data races with concurrent calls to rand or srand. Some libraries provide an alternative function that explicitly avoids this kind of data race: rand_r (non-portable). C++ library implementations are allowed to guarantee no data races for calling this function.
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/* generate random number by rand() function example */ #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <time.h> // use time.h header file to use time int main() { int num, i; time_t t1; // declare time variable printf(" Enter a number to set the limit for a random number \n"); scanf (" %d", &num); /* define the random number generator */ srand ( (unsigned) time (&t1)); // pass the srand() parameter printf("\n"); // print the space /* generate random number between 0 to 50 */ for (i = 0; i <num; i++) { printf( "%d \n", rand() % 50); } return 0; }
#define Directive in C
In the C Programming Language, the #define directive allows the definition of macros within your source code. These macro definitions allow constant values to be declared for use throughout your code. Macro definitions are not variables and cannot be changed by your program code like variables. You generally use this syntax when creating constants that represent numbers, strings or expressions.
Syntax for #define Directive in C
#define NAME value /* this syntax creates a constant using define*/ // Or #define NAME (expression) /* this syntax creates a constant using define*/
NAME
is the name of a particular constant. It can either be defined in smaller case or upper case or both. Most of the developers prefer the constant names to be in the upper case to find the differences.
value
defines the value of the constant.
Expression
is the value that is assigned to that constant which is defined. The expression should always be enclosed within the brackets if it has any operators. In the C programming language, the preprocessor directive acts an important role within which the #define directive is present that is used to define the constant or the micro substitution. The #define directive can use any of the basic data types present in the C standard. The #define preprocessor directive lets a programmer or a developer define the macros within the source code. This macro definition will allow the constant value that should be declared for the usage. Macro definitions cannot be changed within the program's code as one does with other variables, as macros are not variables. The #define is usually used in syntax that created a constant that is used to represent numbers, strings, or other expressions. The #define directive should not be enclosed with the semicolon(;). It is a common mistake done, and one should always treat this directive as any other header file. Enclosing it with a semicolon will generate an error. The #define creates a macro, which is in association with an identifier or is parameterized identifier along with a token string. After the macro is defined, then the compiler can substitute the token string for each occurrence of the identifier within the source file.
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/* #define directive allows the definition of macros within your source code. These macro definitions allow constant values to be declared for use throughout your code. */ #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> typedef struct Books { char title[50]; char author[50]; char subject[100]; int book_id; } Book; int main( ) { Book book; strcpy( book.title, "C Programming"); strcpy( book.author, "XCoder"); strcpy( book.subject, "C Programming Tutorial"); book.book_id = 6495407; printf( "Book title : %s\n", book.title); printf( "Book author : %s\n", book.author); printf( "Book subject : %s\n", book.subject); printf( "Book book_id : %d\n", book.book_id); return 0; }
#include Directive in C
#include is a way of including a standard or user-defined file in the program and is mostly written at the beginning of any C/C++ program. This directive is read by the preprocessor and orders it to insert the content of a user-defined or system header file into the following program. These files are mainly imported from an outside source into the current program. The process of importing such files that might be system-defined or user-defined is known as File Inclusion. This type of preprocessor directive tells the compiler to include a file in the source code program. Here are the two types of file that can be included using #include: • Header File or Standard files: This is a file which contains C/C++ function declarations and macro definitions to be shared between several source files. Functions like the printf(), scanf(), cout, cin and various other input-output or other standard functions are contained within different header files. So to utilise those functions, the users need to import a few header files which define the required functions. • User-defined files: These files resembles the header files, except for the fact that they are written and defined by the user itself. This saves the user from writing a particular function multiple times. Once a user-defined file is written, it can be imported anywhere in the program using the #include preprocessor.
Syntax for #include Directive in C
#include "user-defined_file"
Including using " ": When using the double quotes(" "), the preprocessor access the current directory in which the source "header_file" is located. This type is mainly used to access any header files of the user's program or user-defined files.
#include <header_file>
Including using <>: While importing file using angular brackets(<>), the the preprocessor uses a predetermined directory path to access the file. It is mainly used to access system header files located in the standard system directories.
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/* #include directive tells the preprocessor to insert the contents of another file into the source code at the point where the #include directive is found. */ // C program to illustrate file inclusion // <> used to import system header file #include <stdio.h> // " " used to import user-defined file #include "process.h" // main function int main() { // add function defined in process.h add(10, 20); // mult function defined in process.h multiply(10, 20); // printf defined in stdio.h printf("Process completed"); return 0; }
What is an Array in C Language
An array is defined as the collection of similar type of data items stored at contiguous memory locations. Arrays are the derived data type in C programming language which can store the primitive type of data such as int, char, double, float, etc. It also has the capability to store the collection of derived data types, such as pointers, structure, etc. The array is the simplest data structure where each data element can be randomly accessed by using its index number. C array is beneficial if you have to store similar elements. For example, if we want to store the marks of a student in 6 subjects, then we don't need to define different variables for the marks in the different subject. Instead of that, we can define an array which can store the marks in each subject at the contiguous memory locations. By using the array, we can access the elements easily. Only a few lines of code are required to access the elements of the array.
Properties of Array
The array contains the following properties. • Each element of an array is of same data type and carries the same size, i.e., int = 4 bytes. • Elements of the array are stored at contiguous memory locations where the first element is stored at the smallest memory location. • Elements of the array can be randomly accessed since we can calculate the address of each element of the array with the given base address and the size of the data element.
Advantage of C Array
• 1) Code Optimization: Less code to the access the data. • 2) Ease of traversing: By using the for loop, we can retrieve the elements of an array easily. • 3) Ease of sorting: To sort the elements of the array, we need a few lines of code only. • 4) Random Access: We can access any element randomly using the array.
Disadvantage of C Array
• 1) Allows a fixed number of elements to be entered which is decided at the time of declaration. Unlike a linked list, an array in C is not dynamic. • 2) Insertion and deletion of elements can be costly since the elements are needed to be managed in accordance with the new memory allocation.
Declaration of C Array
To declare an array in C, a programmer specifies the type of the elements and the number of elements required by an array as follows
type arrayName [ arraySize ];
This is called a single-dimensional array. The arraySize must be an integer constant greater than zero and type can be any valid C data type. For example, to declare a 10-element array called balance of type double, use this statement
double balance[10];
Here balance is a variable array which is sufficient to hold up to 10 double numbers.
Initializing Arrays
You can initialize an array in C either one by one or using a single statement as follows
double balance[5] = {850, 3.0, 7.4, 7.0, 88};
The number of values between braces { } cannot be larger than the number of elements that we declare for the array between square brackets [ ]. If you omit the size of the array, an array just big enough to hold the initialization is created. Therefore, if you write
double balance[] = {850, 3.0, 7.4, 7.0, 88};
Accessing Array Elements
An element is accessed by indexing the array name. This is done by placing the index of the element within square brackets after the name of the array.
double salary = balance[9];
The above statement will take the 10th element from the array and assign the value to salary variable.
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/* arrays in C Language */ #include<stdio.h> void main () { int i, j,temp; int a[10] = { 4, 8, 16, 120, 36, 44, 13, 88, 90, 23}; for(i = 0; i<10; i++) { for(j = i+1; j<10; j++) { if(a[j] > a[i]) { temp = a[i]; a[i] = a[j]; a[j] = temp; } } } printf("Printing Sorted Element List ...\n"); for(i = 0; i<10; i++) { printf("%d\n",a[i]); } }
If Else If Ladder in C/C++
The if...else statement executes two different codes depending upon whether the test expression is true or false. Sometimes, a choice has to be made from more than 2 possibilities. The if...else ladder allows you to check between multiple test expressions and execute different statements. In C/C++ if-else-if ladder helps user decide from among multiple options. The C/C++ if statements are executed from the top down. As soon as one of the conditions controlling the if is true, the statement associated with that if is executed, and the rest of the C else-if ladder is bypassed. If none of the conditions is true, then the final else statement will be executed.
Syntax of if...else Ladder in C
if (Condition1) { Statement1; } else if(Condition2) { Statement2; } . . . else if(ConditionN) { StatementN; } else { Default_Statement; }
In the above syntax of if-else-if, if the Condition1 is TRUE then the Statement1 will be executed and control goes to next statement in the program following if-else-if ladder. If Condition1 is FALSE then Condition2 will be checked, if Condition2 is TRUE then Statement2 will be executed and control goes to next statement in the program following if-else-if ladder. Similarly, if Condition2 is FALSE then next condition will be checked and the process continues. If all the conditions in the if-else-if ladder are evaluated to FALSE, then Default_Statement will be executed.
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/* write a C program which demonstrate use of if-else-if ladder statement */ #include<stdio.h> #include<conio.h> void main() { int a; printf("Enter a Number: "); scanf("%d",&a); if(a > 0) { printf("Given Number is Positive"); } else if(a == 0) { printf("Given Number is Zero"); } else if(a < 0) { printf("Given Number is Negative"); } getch(); }
main() Function in C
In C, the "main" function is treated the same as every function, it has a return type (and in some cases accepts inputs via parameters). The only difference is that the main function is "called" by the operating system when the user runs the program. Thus the main function is always the first code executed when a program starts. main() function is a user defined, body of the function is defined by the programmer or we can say main() is programmer/user implemented function, whose prototype is predefined in the compiler. Hence we can say that main() in c programming is user defined as well as predefined because it's prototype is predefined. main() is a system (compiler) declared function whose defined by the user, which is invoked automatically by the operating system when program is being executed. Its first function or entry point of the program from where program start executed, program's execution starts from the main. So main is an important function in c , c++ programming language.
Syntax for main() Function in C
void main() { ......... // codes start from here ......... }
void
is a keyword in C language, void means nothing, whenever we use void as a function return type then that function nothing return. here main() function no return any value. In place of void we can also use int return type of main() function, at that time main() return integer type value.
main
is a name of function which is predefined function in C library. • An operating system always calls the main() function when a programmers or users execute their programming code. • It is responsible for starting and ends of the program. • It is a universally accepted keyword in programming language and cannot change its meaning and name. • A main() function is a user-defined function in C that means we can pass parameters to the main() function according to the requirement of a program. • A main() function is used to invoke the programming code at the run time, not at the compile time of a program. • A main() function is followed by opening and closing parenthesis brackets.
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/* basic c program by main() function example */ #include <stdio.h> #include <conio.h> main() { printf (" It is a main() function "); int fun2(); // jump to void fun1() function printf ("\n Finally exit from the main() function. "); } void fun1() { printf (" It is a second function. "); printf (" Exit from the void fun1() function. "); } int fun2() { void fun1(); // jump to the int fun1() function printf (" It is a third function. "); printf (" Exit from the int fun2() function. "); return 0; }


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